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Trump aide claims 'huge movement' of black voters to GOP

Trump aide claims 'huge movement' of black voters to GOP
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Omarosa Manigault, an aide to President-elect Donald TrumpDonald TrumpGiuliani used provisional ballot to vote in 2020 election, same method he disparaged in fighting to overturn results Trump gets lowest job approval rating in final days as president Fox News' DC managing editor Bill Sammon to retire MORE, claimed Wednesday that there is a "huge movement" of African-Americans moving to the Republican Party. 

Manigault, who worked for in the Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonThe challenge of Biden's first days: staying focused and on message Why the Senate should not rush an impeachment trial Revising the pardon power — let the Speaker and Congress have voices MORE White House for Vice President Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreFox News' DC managing editor Bill Sammon to retire Will Pence be able to escape the Trump stain? Vice President Pence: Honor in humility MORE and who voted for President Obama, said she used to be a Democrat. 

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"Traditionally, African-Americans have been Democrat, and I think the Democrats have taken advantage and taken for granted the African-American vote," she said on Fox News Wednesday evening.
 
"You are seeing a huge movement of African-Americans moving to the Republican Party." 
 
Trump received 8 percent support among black voters, slightly outperforming the 6 percent support GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney received in 2012, according to New York Times exit polls.
 
But African-Americans overwhelmingly favored Clinton on Election Day — 88 percent voted for her. 
 
In 2004, President George W. Bush received 11 percent support among black voters, while Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainWhat to watch for in Biden Defense pick's confirmation hearing The best way to handle veterans, active-duty military that participated in Capitol riot Cindy McCain on possible GOP censure: 'I think I'm going to make T-shirts' MORE (R-Ariz.) received 4 percent support among African-Americans in 2008 when he faced Obama.