Ginsburg: I would back changing the Electoral College

Ginsburg: I would back changing the Electoral College
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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she would support changing the Electoral College.

“There are some things I would like to change, one is the Electoral College,” she said late Monday at Stanford Law School in California, according to CNN.

“But that would require a constitutional amendment, and amending our Constitution is powerfully hard to do,” she added.

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Ginsburg also lamented partisan divisions in Congress, which she said hurt the confirmation process for justices.

“I wish there was a way I could wave a magic wand and put back when people were respectful of each other and the Congress was working for the good of the country and not just along party lines,” she said.

“Someday there will be great people, great elected representatives who will say, ‘enough of this nonsense, let’s be the kind of legislature the United States should have,’” the 83-year-old judge added. "I hope that day will come when I’m still alive.”

Ginsburg’s remarks follow President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the Supreme Court’s vacancy left by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. Gorsuch sits on Colorado’s 10th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals.

Trump also reportedly told congressional leaders he was considering eliminating the Electoral College late last month.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPatagonia says to shut stores for a few hours during Global Climate Strike Overnight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes On The Money: House votes to avert shutdown, fund government through November | Judge blocks California law requiring Trump tax returns | Senate panel approves three spending bills MORE (R-Ky.) purportedly talked Trump out of the idea, citing the length of a recount for a national popular vote on the presidency. McConnell allegedly raised the grueling recount in Florida during the 2000 election cycle.

Trump won the Electoral College in November but lost the popular vote to 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGiuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it Sanders hits 1 million donors Democrats will not beat Trump without moderate policy ideas MORE by nearly three million votes. He has since repeatedly insisted voter fraud helped Clinton beat him in last year’s popular vote.

Trump said in an interview aired Sunday he would have Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PencePence taps former DHS spokeswoman as his new press secretary GOP group hits Pence over Trump alleged business conflicts Billionaire to host top-dollar fundraiser in New York City for President Trump MORE oversee a special commission to investigate voter fraud.