Ginsburg: I would back changing the Electoral College

Ginsburg: I would back changing the Electoral College
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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she would support changing the Electoral College.

“There are some things I would like to change, one is the Electoral College,” she said late Monday at Stanford Law School in California, according to CNN.

“But that would require a constitutional amendment, and amending our Constitution is powerfully hard to do,” she added.

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Ginsburg also lamented partisan divisions in Congress, which she said hurt the confirmation process for justices.

“I wish there was a way I could wave a magic wand and put back when people were respectful of each other and the Congress was working for the good of the country and not just along party lines,” she said.

“Someday there will be great people, great elected representatives who will say, ‘enough of this nonsense, let’s be the kind of legislature the United States should have,’” the 83-year-old judge added. "I hope that day will come when I’m still alive.”

Ginsburg’s remarks follow President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to fill the Supreme Court’s vacancy left by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. Gorsuch sits on Colorado’s 10th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals.

Trump also reportedly told congressional leaders he was considering eliminating the Electoral College late last month.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump keeps up attacks on 'horrible' McCain, despite calls from GOP, veterans Rock the Vote President says Dem reform bill 'shines a light' on dark money The Hill's Morning Report - Trump's intraparty feuds divide Republicans MORE (R-Ky.) purportedly talked Trump out of the idea, citing the length of a recount for a national popular vote on the presidency. McConnell allegedly raised the grueling recount in Florida during the 2000 election cycle.

Trump won the Electoral College in November but lost the popular vote to 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClinton and Ocasio-Cortez joke about Kushner's alleged use of WhatsApp Hillicon Valley: Kushner accused of using WhatsApp, personal email for official work | White House rejects request for Trump-Putin communications | Facebook left 'hundreds of millions' of passwords unsecured | Tech pressured to root out extremism Man accused of mailing pipe bombs to Dems pleads guilty MORE by nearly three million votes. He has since repeatedly insisted voter fraud helped Clinton beat him in last year’s popular vote.

Trump said in an interview aired Sunday he would have Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceOvernight Health Care: Trump officials sued over Medicaid work requirements in New Hampshire | Analysis contradicts HHS claims on Arkansas Medicaid changes | Azar signals HHS won't back down on e-cigs Trump health chief backs needle exchanges in anti-HIV strategy Pence travels to Nebraska to survey flood damage MORE oversee a special commission to investigate voter fraud.