Ex-Clinton aide: Gillibrand a ‘hypocrite’ for saying Bill should have resigned

Ex-Clinton aide: Gillibrand a ‘hypocrite’ for saying Bill should have resigned

A former senior adviser to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClinton campaign chief: Mueller report 'lays out a devastating case' against Trump Hillicon Valley: Cyber, tech takeaways from Mueller report | Millions of Instagram passwords exposed internally by Facebook | DHS unrolling facial recognition tech in airports | Uber unveils new safety measures after student's killing Heavily redacted Mueller report leaves major questions unanswered MORE lambasted Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandButtigieg says he wouldn't be opposed to having Phish play at his inauguration 2020 Dems call on Mueller to testify about redacted report 2020 Dems blast Barr's defense of Trump before Mueller report's release MORE (D-N.Y.) on Twitter for saying former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonTrump team spurns Adam Smith with its trade stance New Broadway play 'Hillary and Clinton' debuts Trump will allow Americans to sue companies in Cuba MORE should have resigned following the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

"Ken Starr spent $70 million on a consensual blowjob. Senate voted to keep POTUS WJC. But not enough for you @SenGillibrand? Over 20 yrs you took the Clintons’ endorsements, money, and seat. Hypocrite," Philippe Reines wrote on Twitter.

Ken Starr was the independent counsel who investigated Bill Clinton during the Lewinsky scandal and Whitewater investigation. The probe cost $70 million.
 

Reines made the comment after Gillibrand told reporters Thursday that Bill Clinton should have resigned. 

When asked by The New York Times if Bill Clinton, who stayed in office after his relationship with the former intern was revealed, should have resigned, Gillibrand said “yes.”

“I think that is the appropriate response,” she told the Times.

Bill Clinton engaged in a sexual relationship with Lewinsky, who was 22 at the time, between 1995 and 1996. It was revealed in 1998.

Bill Clinton denied the inappropriate relationship, but later admitted it occurred, which lead to the Republican-controlled House voting to impeach him in 1998. He was later acquitted of the charges in the Senate and remained in office.

Gillibrand's comment comes amid revelations of sexual harassment and assault in Congress, including allegations against Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenWinners and losers from first fundraising quarter Election analyst says Gillibrand doesn't have 'horsepower to go the full distance' Gillibrand campaign links low fundraising to Al Franken backlash: memo MORE (D-Minn.), who was accused Thursday of groping and inappropriately kissing Leeann Tweeden, a radio host and former sports commentator, in 2006.

Gillibrand, along with Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), introduced legislation Wednesday that would overhaul policies to combat and report complaints of sexual harassment on Capitol Hill.