2017's top ten news stories

The last year was extraordinary when it comes to news — chiefly because of one person: President TrumpDonald John TrumpSecret Service members who helped organize Pence Arizona trip test positive for COVID-19: report Trump administration planning pandemic office at the State Department: report Iran releases photo of damaged nuclear fuel production site: report MORE.

Trump’s actions, from his Twitter account to his executive actions to the various controversies that swirled around the White House, dominated headlines throughout the year.

Here’s a look back at the biggest 10 stories of the year, many of which had something to do with the U.S. president.

  1. Donald Trump’s presidency.

The Trump presidency itself is the biggest story of the year.

Since inauguration day, Trump has been the top story of the year, and he has seemingly delighted in providing copy for the nation’s media — even as he has feuded with them.

The day after the inauguration, White House press secretary Sean SpicerSean Michael SpicerBolton denies saying he will back Biden over Trump in November Trump campaign touts 4M online viewers for Tulsa rally Trump mocked for low attendance at rally MORE slammed news reports that suggested inauguration crowds were not the largest in history — a point refuted by photographic evidence.

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The performance was a sign of what was to come.

A week later, Trump announced a ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations, sparking an uproar that continued for months.

The initial weeks of the year featured large protests against the new president. Marches on Washington became weekly events.

White House aides surrounding the president became celebrities themselves, from Spicer and counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayLincoln Project hits Trump over Russian bounties Obama said Trump's use of term 'kung flu' 'shocks and pisses me off': report New Lincoln Project ad slams Trump over deaths of 'Greatest Generation' members from COVID-19 MORE to former White House strategist Stephen Bannon and Anthony “the Mooch” Scaramucci, whose career as White House communications director was short-lived.

In a normal year, Scaramucci’s tenure and Bannon’s firing — to say nothing of the firing of former White House chief of staff Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusMeadows joins White House facing reelection challenges Trump names Mark Meadows as new chief of staff Mick Mulvaney's job security looks strong following impeachment MORE — might have been their own entries on this list.

Not this year. It all leaves one wondering what year two of the Trump presidency will bring.

Trump himself took credit for stimulating the news business in an interview Thursday with The New York Times, predicting that he’ll win reelection in 2020 because without him, “all forms of media will tank.”

The president may be right, but he’ll want to improve his approval ratings by then. The constant controversy appeared to make its mark.  

As of Dec. 29, Trump sits at 39.3 percent in the Real Clear Politics average of polls.

  1. Trump fires FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyBolton book sells 780,000 copies in first week, set to surpass 1M copies printed The Seila Law case: Liberty and political firing A new age of lies? MORE

Trump’s abrupt decision to fire FBI Director James Comey in May was the stunner of the year.

It rocked Washington and threw into uncertainty the ongoing investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 election.

It also led to one of the most dramatic congressional hearings in U.S. history, when Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence panel in June. Much of the nation stood transfixed, with bars filling in the middle of the day so that people could watch.

Comey’s ouster set into motion a series of events, including the appointment of former FBI Director Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE as special counsel to head up the criminal investigation into Russian interference. Some Trump loyalists see the firing as Trump’s biggest mistake, because it birthed the Mueller probe.

The reverberations will be felt in 2018, and perhaps for a lot longer. 

  1. The Trump tax cuts are passed

Trump got a huge Christmas present from the GOP Congress when it passed a sweeping $1.5 trillion tax bill days before the holiday.

It capped a difficult year in Congress, but many of the disappointments were forgotten following the tax bill’s passage, the biggest such legislation to be approved since the Reagan era.

Households and businesses across the country will be affected by the legislation, which chopped the corporate rate from 35 percent to 21 percent.

It was also a huge victory for Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanBush, Romney won't support Trump reelection: NYT Twitter joins Democrats to boost mail-in voting — here's why Lobbying world MORE (R-Wis.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnell'Comrade' Trump gets 'endorsement' from Putin in new mock ad by Lincoln Project ACLU calls on Congress to approve COVID-19 testing for immigrants Carville repeats prediction that Trump will drop out of race MORE (R-Ky.).

  1. ObamaCare repeal fails as McCain casts dramatic, deciding vote.

Congressional Republicans scrambled all summer to repeal ObamaCare.

But in an early morning July vote on a slimmed-down version of a repeal bill, Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJuan Williams: Time for boldness from Biden Democrats lead in three battleground Senate races: poll Republican Scott Taylor wins Virginia primary, to face Elaine Luria in rematch MORE (R-Ariz.) sided with Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Stagwell President Mark Penn says Trump is losing on fighting the virus; Fauci says U.S. 'going in the wrong direction' in fight against virus GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday Senate passes extension of application deadline for PPP small-business loans MORE (R-Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators will have access to intelligence on Russian bounties on US troops Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police Senators push to limit transfer of military-grade equipment to police MORE (R-Alaska) and the chamber’s Democrats in rejecting the measure, throwing a wrench into the GOP’s efforts to do away with former President Obama’s signature health-care law.

McCain did so in the most dramatic way possible.

Days earlier, he had returned to Washington after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer. In a speech on the Senate floor, the Arizona Republican admonished his party for abandoning what he called “regular order” in its pursuit of an ObamaCare repeal.

As the clock ticked down to the Senate vote, all eyes were on McCain, whose decision remained unclear until the very end. He eventually signaled his vote with a thumbs-down gesture as McConnell looked on. The vote failed, 51-49.

The GOP did repeal ObamaCare’s individual mandate as part of the tax vote. McCain supported that bill, but missed the vote as he continued to battle his cancer diagnosis and his colleagues contemplated his future. 

  1. Charlottesville

Trump’s words blaming “both sides” for the violence in this Virginia college town last August between white supremacists and those protesting them led to criticism of the president from most of his party — a low point for the White House.

Trump offered his take hours after a 32-year-old woman named Heather Heyer was killed after a man drove a car through a crowd marching against white supremacists.

A few days later at Trump Tower, he doubled down, stunning Republicans.

“I think there's blame on both sides. And I have no doubt about that,” Trump said on Aug. 15. 

  1. Mueller indicts Manafort and Flynn

For months, Mueller worked behind the scenes, with little if anything leaking out about his team’s activities.

Then, in October, came the sudden news that former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump turns to immigration; primary day delays expected GOP votes to give Graham broad subpoena power in Obama-era probe Will the 'law and order' president pardon Roger Stone? MORE and one of his associates, Richard Gates, had been indicted on charges of money laundering, among other things.

Even bigger news dropped minutes later when court documents revealed that George PapadopoulosGeorge Demetrios PapadopoulosNew FBI document confirms the Trump campaign was investigated without justification Republicans plow ahead with Russia origins probe AG Barr just signaled that things are about to get ugly for the Russia collusion team MORE, a former foreign policy adviser to Trump’s campaign, had pleaded guilty to lying to FBI agents and was now cooperating with the probe.

Weeks later came even worse news for Trump. Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser, also pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and was cooperating with Mueller.

The indictments and guilty pleas have everyone, from the White House to Congress to the nation, wondering what will come next.

  1. Sexual harassment rocks the political world.

The #MeToo movement unleashed by the storm surrounding movie mogul Harvey Weinstein hit Washington in December when Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenPolitical world mourns loss of comedian Jerry Stiller Maher to Tara Reade on timing of sexual assault allegation: 'Why wait until Biden is our only hope?' Democrats begin to confront Biden allegations MORE (D-Minn.), who had been considered a presidential contender, and Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersFormer impeachment managers clash over surveillance bill VA could lead way for nation on lower drug pricing The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems release first transcripts from impeachment probe witnesses MORE Jr. (D-Mich.), the longest-serving member of the House, both resigned after allegations of sexual misconduct.

Rep. Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksArizona New Members 2019 Cook shifts 8 House races toward Dems Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (R-Ariz.) also resigned after it became public that he had discussed the possibility of female staffers serving his his surrogate.

Two other members, Reps. Ruben KihuenRuben Jesus KihuenRep. Steven Horsford wins Democratic House primary in Nevada Members spar over sexual harassment training deadline Nevada Dem sanctioned for sexual misconduct announces city council bid MORE (D-Nev.) and Blake FarentholdRandolph (Blake) Blake FarentholdThe biggest political upsets of the decade Members spar over sexual harassment training deadline Female Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations MORE (R-Texas), have announced they will not run for reelection after allegations of sexual misconduct.

As December closed, many lawmakers were wondering who would be next.

  1. Democrats win Alabama Senate seat after Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreTrump to hold rally in Sessions's hometown for opponent in Senate runoff: report Sessions-Tuberville Senate runoff heats up in Alabama Sessions goes after Tuberville's coaching record in challenging him to debate MORE controversy

Democrat Doug Jones pulled off a stunning win in Alabama’s special Senate election on Dec. 12, capping off a bitter race marked by sexual misconduct allegations against Republican Roy Moore.

With his narrow victory over Moore, Jones became the first Democrat to be elected to the Senate in Alabama in 25 years.

Moore, an insurgent former Alabama Supreme Court justice, was largely considered the favorite to win after defeating incumbent Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeThe biggest political upsets of the decade State 'certificate of need' laws need to go GOP frets over nightmare scenario for Senate primaries MORE (R-Ala.) in the state’s GOP runoff in September. Strange had been backed by both McConnell and Trump.

But allegations emerged in November that Moore pursued sexual and romantic relations with teenage girls when he was in his 30s, prompting calls by many Republican officials and lawmakers for Moore to withdraw from the race.

Moore rebuffed those pleas, and denied the allegations against him, insisting that they were politically motivated. In the days before the election, he received a boost from Trump, who offered him a full-throated endorsement.

But Jones ultimately emerged victorious over Moore, propelled by a strong turnout among black voters. The Democratic victory dealt a blow to Bannon, the Breitbart News chief and former White House chief strategist, who backed Moore in the race.

  1. Trump’s travel ban

President Trump introduced his controversial travel ban just one week after taking office, sparking widespread protests fueled by social media at airports across the country after several refugees were detained.

The ban, which called for the U.S. to restrict travelers from selected Muslim-majority countries, triggered a court battle that lasted throughout the year.

But on Dec. 4, the Supreme Court provided the president with a major victory by granting the administration’s request to fully reinstate a revised version of his travel ban.

The ban will now likely be an issue in the midterms — and in the presidential race of 2020.

  1. Gorsuch is confirmed to the Supreme Court.

More than a year after Obama nominated Judge Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandMcConnell easily wins Kentucky Senate primary Don't mess with the Supreme Court Graham on potential Supreme Court vacancy: 'This would be a different circumstance' than Merrick Garland MORE to fill the vacancy left by the late Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court, Trump had his own pick, Neil Gorsuch, confirmed to the court.

Gorsuch’s confirmation amounted to one of Trump’s biggest wins of his first year in office. It was also a huge win for McConnell, who devised the strategy to block Obama’s pick.

Gorsuch was just one of Trump’s judicial appointees. In his first year in office, the real estate mogul has filled seats on federal courts across the country with conservative judges, reshaping the judiciary for decades to come.