2017's top ten news stories

The last year was extraordinary when it comes to news — chiefly because of one person: President TrumpDonald John TrumpMnuchin knocks Greta Thunberg's activism: Study economics and then 'come back' to us The Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' What to watch for on Day 3 of Senate impeachment trial MORE.

Trump’s actions, from his Twitter account to his executive actions to the various controversies that swirled around the White House, dominated headlines throughout the year.

Here’s a look back at the biggest 10 stories of the year, many of which had something to do with the U.S. president.

  1. Donald Trump’s presidency.

The Trump presidency itself is the biggest story of the year.

Since inauguration day, Trump has been the top story of the year, and he has seemingly delighted in providing copy for the nation’s media — even as he has feuded with them.

The day after the inauguration, White House press secretary Sean SpicerSean Michael SpicerPress: It's time to bring back White House briefings Rapid turnover shapes Trump's government Pelosi gets under Trump's skin on impeachment MORE slammed news reports that suggested inauguration crowds were not the largest in history — a point refuted by photographic evidence.

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The performance was a sign of what was to come.

A week later, Trump announced a ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations, sparking an uproar that continued for months.

The initial weeks of the year featured large protests against the new president. Marches on Washington became weekly events.

White House aides surrounding the president became celebrities themselves, from Spicer and counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth Conway'Emotion' from Trump's legal team wins presidential plaudits George Conway says Senate GOP knows Trump is 'guilty': 'What are they afraid of?' Kellyanne Conway: Martin Luther King would oppose impeaching Trump MORE to former White House strategist Stephen Bannon and Anthony “the Mooch” Scaramucci, whose career as White House communications director was short-lived.

In a normal year, Scaramucci’s tenure and Bannon’s firing — to say nothing of the firing of former White House chief of staff Reince PriebusReinhold (Reince) Richard PriebusReince Priebus joins CBS News as political analyst CNN hires former longtime CNBC correspondent John Harwood Former Trump staffer suing Trump, campaign over sex discrimination MORE — might have been their own entries on this list.

Not this year. It all leaves one wondering what year two of the Trump presidency will bring.

Trump himself took credit for stimulating the news business in an interview Thursday with The New York Times, predicting that he’ll win reelection in 2020 because without him, “all forms of media will tank.”

The president may be right, but he’ll want to improve his approval ratings by then. The constant controversy appeared to make its mark.  

As of Dec. 29, Trump sits at 39.3 percent in the Real Clear Politics average of polls.

  1. Trump fires FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyNYT: Justice investigating alleged Comey leak of years-old classified info Bernie-Hillary echoes seen in Biden-Sanders primary fight Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' MORE

Trump’s abrupt decision to fire FBI Director James Comey in May was the stunner of the year.

It rocked Washington and threw into uncertainty the ongoing investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 election.

It also led to one of the most dramatic congressional hearings in U.S. history, when Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence panel in June. Much of the nation stood transfixed, with bars filling in the middle of the day so that people could watch.

Comey’s ouster set into motion a series of events, including the appointment of former FBI Director Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE as special counsel to head up the criminal investigation into Russian interference. Some Trump loyalists see the firing as Trump’s biggest mistake, because it birthed the Mueller probe.

The reverberations will be felt in 2018, and perhaps for a lot longer. 

  1. The Trump tax cuts are passed

Trump got a huge Christmas present from the GOP Congress when it passed a sweeping $1.5 trillion tax bill days before the holiday.

It capped a difficult year in Congress, but many of the disappointments were forgotten following the tax bill’s passage, the biggest such legislation to be approved since the Reagan era.

Households and businesses across the country will be affected by the legislation, which chopped the corporate rate from 35 percent to 21 percent.

It was also a huge victory for Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHill.TV's Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders for 'inability to actually fight with bad actors' in party Biden fires back at Sanders on Social Security Warren now also knocking Biden on Social Security MORE (R-Wis.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' Tensions between McConnell and Schumer run high as trial gains momentum No. 2 GOP leader eyes Wednesday of next week for possible votes on witnesses MORE (R-Ky.).

  1. ObamaCare repeal fails as McCain casts dramatic, deciding vote.

Congressional Republicans scrambled all summer to repeal ObamaCare.

But in an early morning July vote on a slimmed-down version of a repeal bill, Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMartha McSally fundraises off 'liberal hack' remark to CNN reporter Meghan McCain blasts NY Times: 'Everyone already knows how much you despise' conservative women GOP senator calls CNN reporter a 'liberal hack' when asked about Parnas materials MORE (R-Ariz.) sided with Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' Tensions between McConnell and Schumer run high as trial gains momentum No. 2 GOP leader eyes Wednesday of next week for possible votes on witnesses MORE (R-Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTensions between McConnell and Schumer run high as trial gains momentum No. 2 GOP leader eyes Wednesday of next week for possible votes on witnesses Collins walks impeachment tightrope MORE (R-Alaska) and the chamber’s Democrats in rejecting the measure, throwing a wrench into the GOP’s efforts to do away with former President Obama’s signature health-care law.

McCain did so in the most dramatic way possible.

Days earlier, he had returned to Washington after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer. In a speech on the Senate floor, the Arizona Republican admonished his party for abandoning what he called “regular order” in its pursuit of an ObamaCare repeal.

As the clock ticked down to the Senate vote, all eyes were on McCain, whose decision remained unclear until the very end. He eventually signaled his vote with a thumbs-down gesture as McConnell looked on. The vote failed, 51-49.

The GOP did repeal ObamaCare’s individual mandate as part of the tax vote. McCain supported that bill, but missed the vote as he continued to battle his cancer diagnosis and his colleagues contemplated his future. 

  1. Charlottesville

Trump’s words blaming “both sides” for the violence in this Virginia college town last August between white supremacists and those protesting them led to criticism of the president from most of his party — a low point for the White House.

Trump offered his take hours after a 32-year-old woman named Heather Heyer was killed after a man drove a car through a crowd marching against white supremacists.

A few days later at Trump Tower, he doubled down, stunning Republicans.

“I think there's blame on both sides. And I have no doubt about that,” Trump said on Aug. 15. 

  1. Mueller indicts Manafort and Flynn

For months, Mueller worked behind the scenes, with little if anything leaking out about his team’s activities.

Then, in October, came the sudden news that former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortDOJ releases new tranche of Mueller witness documents Treasury adviser pleads guilty to making unauthorized disclosures in case involving Manafort DOJ argues Democrats no longer need Mueller documents after impeachment vote MORE and one of his associates, Richard Gates, had been indicted on charges of money laundering, among other things.

Even bigger news dropped minutes later when court documents revealed that George PapadopoulosGeorge Demetrios PapadopoulosCalifornia Democrat Christy Smith launches first TV ad in bid for Katie Hill's former House seat DOJ releases new tranche of Mueller witness documents Trump rails against Fox News for planning interviews with Schiff, Comey MORE, a former foreign policy adviser to Trump’s campaign, had pleaded guilty to lying to FBI agents and was now cooperating with the probe.

Weeks later came even worse news for Trump. Michael Flynn, the former national security adviser, also pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and was cooperating with Mueller.

The indictments and guilty pleas have everyone, from the White House to Congress to the nation, wondering what will come next.

  1. Sexual harassment rocks the political world.

The #MeToo movement unleashed by the storm surrounding movie mogul Harvey Weinstein hit Washington in December when Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenBill Press: Don't forget about Amy Key moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far Al Franken mocks McConnell: 'Like listening to Jeffrey Dahmer complain about the decline of dinner party etiquette' MORE (D-Minn.), who had been considered a presidential contender, and Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems release first transcripts from impeachment probe witnesses Hispanic Caucus dedicates Day of the Dead altar to migrants who died in US custody Today On Rising: The media beclowns themselves on Baghdadi MORE Jr. (D-Mich.), the longest-serving member of the House, both resigned after allegations of sexual misconduct.

Rep. Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksArizona New Members 2019 Cook shifts 8 House races toward Dems Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (R-Ariz.) also resigned after it became public that he had discussed the possibility of female staffers serving his his surrogate.

Two other members, Reps. Ruben KihuenRuben Jesus KihuenMembers spar over sexual harassment training deadline Nevada Dem sanctioned for sexual misconduct announces city council bid Dem gains put Sunbelt in play for 2020 MORE (D-Nev.) and Blake FarentholdRandolph (Blake) Blake FarentholdThe biggest political upsets of the decade Members spar over sexual harassment training deadline Female Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations MORE (R-Texas), have announced they will not run for reelection after allegations of sexual misconduct.

As December closed, many lawmakers were wondering who would be next.

  1. Democrats win Alabama Senate seat after Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreThe 5 most vulnerable senators in 2020 The biggest political upsets of the decade GOP predicts bipartisan acquittal at Trump impeachment trial MORE controversy

Democrat Doug Jones pulled off a stunning win in Alabama’s special Senate election on Dec. 12, capping off a bitter race marked by sexual misconduct allegations against Republican Roy Moore.

With his narrow victory over Moore, Jones became the first Democrat to be elected to the Senate in Alabama in 25 years.

Moore, an insurgent former Alabama Supreme Court justice, was largely considered the favorite to win after defeating incumbent Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeThe biggest political upsets of the decade State 'certificate of need' laws need to go GOP frets over nightmare scenario for Senate primaries MORE (R-Ala.) in the state’s GOP runoff in September. Strange had been backed by both McConnell and Trump.

But allegations emerged in November that Moore pursued sexual and romantic relations with teenage girls when he was in his 30s, prompting calls by many Republican officials and lawmakers for Moore to withdraw from the race.

Moore rebuffed those pleas, and denied the allegations against him, insisting that they were politically motivated. In the days before the election, he received a boost from Trump, who offered him a full-throated endorsement.

But Jones ultimately emerged victorious over Moore, propelled by a strong turnout among black voters. The Democratic victory dealt a blow to Bannon, the Breitbart News chief and former White House chief strategist, who backed Moore in the race.

  1. Trump’s travel ban

President Trump introduced his controversial travel ban just one week after taking office, sparking widespread protests fueled by social media at airports across the country after several refugees were detained.

The ban, which called for the U.S. to restrict travelers from selected Muslim-majority countries, triggered a court battle that lasted throughout the year.

But on Dec. 4, the Supreme Court provided the president with a major victory by granting the administration’s request to fully reinstate a revised version of his travel ban.

The ban will now likely be an issue in the midterms — and in the presidential race of 2020.

  1. Gorsuch is confirmed to the Supreme Court.

More than a year after Obama nominated Judge Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandMitch McConnell may win the impeachment and lose the Senate The Trumpification of the federal courts Juan Williams: GOP are hypocrites on impeachment MORE to fill the vacancy left by the late Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court, Trump had his own pick, Neil Gorsuch, confirmed to the court.

Gorsuch’s confirmation amounted to one of Trump’s biggest wins of his first year in office. It was also a huge win for McConnell, who devised the strategy to block Obama’s pick.

Gorsuch was just one of Trump’s judicial appointees. In his first year in office, the real estate mogul has filled seats on federal courts across the country with conservative judges, reshaping the judiciary for decades to come.