7 subtle jabs speakers took at Trump during John McCain’s funeral

Mourners on both sides of the aisle gathered at the Washington National Cathedral on Saturday to honor Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump hits McCain on ObamaCare vote GOP, White House start playing midterm blame game Arizona race becomes Senate GOP’s ‘firewall’ MORE (R-Ariz.) 

While Republicans and Democrats — including two former presidents — eulogized the late Arizona senator, one political figure was notably missing: President TrumpDonald John TrumpGrassley: Dems 'withheld information' on new Kavanaugh allegation Health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Groups plan mass walkout in support of Kavanaugh accuser MORE.

Prior to his death, McCain had made arrangements for Trump not to be invited to his memorial services. The president's daughter, Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpHard choices in training Americans for AI workplace of future Ex-Trump, progressive strategists battle over charges of anti-Semitism surrounding Eric Trump Ethics watchdog requests probe into Trump officials traveling to campaign events MORE, and her husband Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerMueller investigating Russian payments made by Trump Tower meeting organizers: report The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil Manafort’s plea deal — the clear winners and losers MORE, however, were in attendance following a reported invitation from Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHouse Judiciary chair threatens subpoena if DOJ doesn’t supply McCabe memos by Tuesday Rosenstein report gives GOP new ammo against DOJ Graham: There's a 'bureaucratic coup' taking place against Trump MORE (R-S.C.), one of McCain's closest friends.

ADVERTISEMENT

McCain and the president had feuded since then-candidate Trump hit the campaign trail. 

Shortly after announcing his candidacy, he denounced McCain's service in the Vietnam War, famously saying "He was a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren't captured." McCain was tortured as a prisoner of war in Vietnam for more than five years.

President Trump also repeatedly lashed out at McCain for breaking with his party to vote against the GOP's repeal of the Affordable Care Act. 

Despite his absence from the Senate this year, McCain remained a visible figure in Washington, frequently clashing with Trump on a variety of issues, including his trade policy and rhetoric toward the media.

During McCain's funeral, Trump tweeted about trade and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's probe into possible ties between his campaign and Russia.

Despite the president's physical absence from McCain's funeral, speakers were quick to take thinly veiled shots at Trump in their eulogies. 

Meghan McCain:

Meghan McCain, John McCain’s daughter, blatantly slammed the president’s rhetoric, taking aim at his campaign-era slogan "Make America Great Again." She also implicitly compared her father’s service during the Vietnam War and Trump’s multiple reported medical deferments from it.

“He was a great man. We gather to mourn the passing of American greatness, the real thing, not cheap rhetoric from men who will never come near the sacrifice, those that live lives of comfort and privilege while he suffered and served.”

She also slammed Trump’s campaign slogan, saying America was always great. 

"The America of John McCain is generous and welcoming and bold. She's resourceful, confident, secure. She meets her responsibilities. She speaks quietly because she's strong. America does not boast because she has no need to. The America of John McCain has no need to be made great again because America was always great."

Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaNational security leaders: Trump's Iran strategy could spark war The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump questions Kavanaugh accuser's account | Accuser may testify Thursday | Midterm blame game begins Dems look to Gillum, Abrams for pathway to victory in tough states MORE:

Former President Obama defeated McCain in the 2008 presidential election, but said he always had a deep respect for his opponent.

Obama appeared to take a swipe at Trump’s immigration policies and seemed to reference the president's questioning of the authenticity of his birth certificate. Trump led the "birther" movement against Obama, falsely claiming for years that he was born outside of the U.S.

"That part of what makes our country great is that our membership is based not on our bloodline, not on what we look like, what our last names are. It's not based on where our parents or grandparents came from or how recently they arrived, but on adherence to a common creed that all of us are created equal."

Obama also seemed to attack Trump’s rhetoric.

"Trafficking in bombastic manufactured outrage, it's politics that pretends to be brave and tough, but in fact is born of fear."

George W. Bush: 

Former President George W. Bush, who defeated McCain in the Republican presidential primary in 2000, appeared to criticize the current political atmosphere.

"At various points throughout his long career, John confronted policies and practices he believed were unworthy of his country. John McCain would insist we are better than this. America is better than this."

Bush also seemed to take a jab at Trump’s immigration policy, saying that McCain's respect for "the dignity inherent in every life … does not stop at borders." 

"He loved freedom with a passion of a man who knew its absence. He respected the dignity inherent in every life, a dignity that does not stop at borders and cannot be erased by dictators."

McCain often clashed with Trump over his policies toward the U.S.–Mexico border, particularly. In June, McCain called on the Trump administration to end its controversial "zero tolerance" policy of separating migrant families at the southern border, deeming it "an affront to the decency of the American people." 

Joe Lieberman:

Former Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) was a close friend of McCain’s and a rumored vice presidential candidate in his 2008 bid.

In his speech, Lieberman took aim at the current political climate and appeared to take a swipe at Trump for his "personal-attack politics." 

"His death seems to have reminded the American people that these values are what makes us a great nation, not the tribal partisanship and personal-attack politics that have recently characterized our life."