SPONSORED:

Manafort forfeits Trump Tower apartment in plea deal

Manafort forfeits Trump Tower apartment in plea deal
© Getty Images

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortFlynn spurs questions of who Trump might pardon next On The Money: Initial jobless claims rise for 2nd week | Dow dips below 30K | Mnuchin draws fire for COVID-19 relief move | Manhattan DA appeals dismissal of Manafort charges Manhattan DA appeals dismissal of Manafort charges to NY high court MORE agreed to forfeit his apartment in Trump Tower instead of one his bank accounts in his plea deal with special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE.

Overall, Manafort forfeited five properties, three bank accounts and a life insurance policy. 

ADVERTISEMENT

The forfeitures are part of an agreement to plea guilty to one count of conspiracy against the United States and one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice by witness tampering. 

Manafort must also cooperate “fully, truthfully, completely, and forthrightly” with the Justice Department in any and all matters that the government finds his cooperation to be relevant. 

The sentencing guidelines outlined in the plea indicate Manafort could face between 17 and almost 22 years in prison for the crimes and pay a fine of $42,400. However, Judge Amy But Berman said the statutory guidelines cap the sentence at five years for each count. 

Prosecutors allege that Manafort illegally lobbied on behalf of the Ukrainian government after failing to register as a foreign agent and laundered over $30 million from his business and evaded over $15 million in taxes. 

Manafort had previously been found guilty of eight counts of bank and tax fraud charges last month in a trial in Virginia. The plea deal also applies to 10 additional counts on which that jury could not reach a consensus.

The guilty plea also heads off a second trial that would have taken place in Washington.