Kavanaugh: I'm asking for a 'fair process'

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh said on Monday that he's asking for a "fair process" as his nomination has been thrown into turmoil by two sexual misconduct allegations.

"I am looking for a fair process. A process where I can defend my integrity and clear my name. ... All I'm asking for is fairness and to be heard," Kavanaugh said during a Fox News interview.

He added that he hopes Americans will "listen to me and the facts I've described and listen to the people who have known me throughout my life. ... I know I'm telling the truth. I know my life-long record."

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Kavanaugh's TV interview is unusual for a Supreme Court nominee, but comes as the White House and congressional Republicans are launching a counteroffensive to help save his nomination.

Kavanaugh added that a "fair process" requires hearing from "both sides."

"I'm not going to let false accusations drive us out of this process and you know we're looking for a fair process," Kavanaugh added.

The interview comes a day after a second sexual misconduct allegation, published in The New Yorker on Sunday, threw Kavanaugh's nomination into a new round of chaos amid a previous allegation that he assaulted a woman in the 1980s.

The New Yorker reported on Sunday night that Senate Democrats are investigating a second sexual misconduct allegation dating back to Kavanaugh’s freshman year at Yale University.

Deborah Ramirez says Kavanaugh exposed himself in front of her during a gathering at Yale. She told The New Yorker that Kavanaugh thrust his penis in her face, causing her to touch it without her consent.

Kavanaugh denied the allegation during the Fox News interview, saying if such a thing had happened, "it would've been the talk of campus." 

Kavanaugh is set to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday over accusations from Christine Blasey Ford. She alleges that during a high school party, Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed and tried to remove her clothes.

Kavanaugh has denied wrongdoing. He added during the interview with Fox News that he "may have met" Ford but they "did not travel in the same social circles."

"I was never at any such party. The other people who are alleged to be present say they do not remember any such party," Kavanuagh said.

"I've never sexually assaulted anyone, not in high school, not ever. I've always treated women with dignity and respect," he continued.

He also sidestepped a question on Monday about where he thought Ford's allegation was "coming from" and why she would "make this up.”

"I am not questioning and have not questioned that perhaps Dr. Ford at some point in her life was sexually assaulted by someone in some place, but what I know is that I've never sexually assaulted anyone," Kavanaugh said. 

Kavanaugh's nomination could soon come under fire from another allegation. 

Michael Avenatti, a lawyer who says he has "credible information" about more sexual misconduct allegations against Kavanaugh, said his client will soon go public.

Avenatti, who also represents adult film star Stormy Daniels, released a screenshot of an email he sent to Senate Judiciary Committee staff saying he was "aware" of evidence that Kavanaugh helped target women to "allow a ‘train’ of men to subsequently gang rape them.”  

Kavanaugh on Monday called the accusation "totally false and outrageous." 

"Never done any such thing, known about any such thing," Kavanaugh told Fox News. 

Republicans are pledging to push forward with Kavanaugh's nomination despite the looming sexual misconduct allegations. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: Fireworks on health care expected at Dem debate | Trump FDA pick dodges on vaping ban | Trump to host meeting on youth vaping Friday | AMA calls for immediate vaping ban GOP senator blocks vote on House-passed Violence Against Women Act On The Money: Senate scraps plan to force second shutdown vote | Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny | McConnell rips House Dems for holding up trade deal MORE (R-Ky.) said earlier Monday that he would receive an up or down vote on the Senate floor. 

But Kavanaugh remains short of the simple majority needed to be confirmed. 

Republicans hold a 51-seat majority in the chamber and can lose one GOP senator before they need help from Democrats to get him onto the Supreme Court. 

No Democrats have said they will vote for Kavanaugh. Several Republicans remain undecided. 

GOP Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTensions rise in Senate's legislative 'graveyard' 2020 Republicans accuse Schumer of snubbing legislation Key Republicans say Biden can break Washington gridlock MORE (Maine), a pivotal vote, said on Monday that she remains undecided and wants to hear from Kavanaugh and Ford at the Thursday hearing. 

“I also am eager for the hearing to take place this Thursday and hear from Judge Kavanaugh and from Dr. Ford,” she said.