Mail bomber suspect to be held without bail

Mail bomber suspect to be held without bail
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The man suspected of sending 14 pipe bombs to prominent Democrats around the country and CNN was charged and ordered to be held without bail during a courtroom appearance Monday.

Reuters reports that the suspect, Cesar Sayoc Jr., will appear in court again Friday.

Sayoc was visibly emotional during his brief Monday court appearance, according to CNN, which reported that his face repeatedly turned red as he teared up.

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Sayoc was charged on five federal counts and could receive up to 48 years in prison if convicted on all of them, according to the news outlet.

The suspect has a lengthy criminal history, including multiple instances of threatening people with bombings, dating back to the 90s. In one instance, he allegedly threatened to blow up Florida Power & Light, while complaining about his utility bill to a customer service representative.

Everyone he allegedly targeted in last week's attempted bombing was a prominent progressive or critic of the current administration. 

That included former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGeorge Takei: US has hit a new low under Trump Democrats slam Puerto Rico governor over 'shameful' comments, back protesters Matt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' MORE, former President Obama, and progressive donor George Soros.

Sayoc also allegedly sent a bomb to CNN's offices in New York City, addressed to former CIA Director John BrennanJohn Owen BrennanWebb: Questions for Robert Mueller A brief timeline of Trump's clashes with intelligence director Dan Coats Trump critic Brennan praises his Iran decision: I 'applaud' him MORE, who is a contributor to NBC News and MSNBC.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpLiz Cheney: 'Send her back' chant 'inappropriate' but not about race, gender Booker: Trump is 'worse than a racist' Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller MORE has called for unity and greater civility in political rhetoric since the bombings.

"We have to come together and send one very clear, strong, unmistakable message that acts or threats of political violence of any kind have no place in the United States of America," he said.