Migrant caravan members sue Trump over proposed border policies

Migrant caravan members sue Trump over proposed border policies
© Stefani Reynolds

Central American migrants who are part of the caravan traveling toward the U.S.-Mexico border have filed a class action lawsuit against President TrumpDonald TrumpMark Walker to stay in North Carolina Senate race Judge lays out schedule for Eastman to speed up records processing for Jan. 6 panel Michael Avenatti cross-examines Stormy Daniels in his own fraud trial MORE, Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsPress: For Trump endorsement: The more sordid, the better Those predicting Facebook's demise are blowing smoke If bitcoin is 'digital gold,' it should be taxed like gold MORE and other members of the administration.

In the lawsuit filed Thursday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, six Honduran migrants and their children argue that Trump cannot legally stop them from seeking asylum in the United States.

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The migrants allege that Trump and his administration are violating the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment, which prohibits the federal government from denying anyone life, liberty or property without due process of law.

Trump said during a speech at the White House on Thursday afternoon that he is "finalizing a plan" to deny asylum claims from people who enter the U.S. illegally as he ramps up his focus on immigration heading into next week's midterm elections.

The president this week also ordered 5,000 service members to the border to stop the caravan inching toward the distant U.S. border and said he could deploy 15,000 more troops.

John Shoreman, the attorney representing the migrants who are suing Trump, called the president's immigration policies “shockingly unconstitutional" in the complaint.

He said Trump’s plan to detain the migrants in the caravan prohibits those seeking asylum from challenging their detainment.

He also alleged that the administration’s plan to house migrant children in tent cities violates a legal agreement designed to ensure the safety of immigrant children.

Shoreman said that under the Flores Agreement, facilities must provide immigrant children with access to toilets and sinks, drinking water, adequate temperature control and ventilation, adequate supervision and contact with family.

In addition to Trump and Sessions, the lawsuit names U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection, Citizenship and Immigration Services, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenUS to restart 'Remain in Mexico' program following court order Far-left bullies resort to harassing, shaming Kyrsten Sinema — it won't work Ex-Trump official: 'No. 1 national security threat I've ever seen' is GOP MORE, former ICE acting Director Thomas Homan, acting CBP Commissioner Kevin McAleenan and Francis Cissna, the director of Citizenship and Immigration Services.