Michelle Obama knocks Hillary Clinton from most-admired women perch: Gallup

Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMan who killed teenager who performed at Obama inauguration sentenced to 84 years in prison December sales cement best-seller status for Michelle Obama's book: report De Niro: Democrats 'have to be more aggressive' MORE has topped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert Former PepsiCo CEO being considered for World Bank chief post: report Live coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing MORE as America’s most admired woman in Gallup's annual poll, marking the first time in 17 years the former presidential candidate and secretary of State did not top the list.

About 15 percent of Americans surveyed picked Obama as their most admired woman, followed by 5 percent for Oprah Winfrey and 4 percent each for Clinton and current first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpOvernight Defense: Trump says he won't declare emergency 'so fast' | Shutdown on track to become longest ever | Military begins withdrawing equipment from Syria | Bolton taps new deputy Bolton names replacement for deputy who clashed with first lady The Hill's Morning Report — Groundhog Day: Negotiations implode as shutdown reaches 20 days MORE.

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Among the men, former President Obama took the title of most admired with 19 percent of the vote. Nearly 13 percent picked President TrumpDonald John TrumpVeterans groups demand end to shutdown: 'Get your act together' Brown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Pence on border wall: Trump won't be ‘deterred’ by Dem ‘obstruction’ MORE

Others on the most admired women list include Queen Elizabeth II, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyState Dept halts cooperation with UN probes into potential US human rights violations: report The Memo: Romney moves stir worries in Trump World Nikki Haley: No member of Congress should be paid during shutdown MORE, human rights activist Malala Yousafzai and House Democratic leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiVeterans groups demand end to shutdown: 'Get your act together' On The Money: Shutdown Day 25 | Dems reject White House invite for talks | Leaders nix recess with no deal | McConnell blocks second House Dem funding bill | IRS workers called back for tax-filing season | Senate bucks Trump on Russia sanctions Overnight Defense: Trump faces blowback over report he discussed leaving NATO | Pentagon extends mission on border | Senate advances measure bucking Trump on Russia sanctions MORE (Calif.).

Other men included on the list are former President George W. Bush, Pope Francis, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Gillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert Dem chairman Cummings meets with Trump health chief to discuss drug prices MORE (I), former President Clinton, the Dalai Lama, former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenBrown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration 5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Gillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert MORE, Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Vice President Pence.

Former President Obama’s ranking, his 11th at the top of the list, puts him just one first-place finish short of tying Dwight Eisenhower for the most times being picked as the country’s most admired man.

This year’s rankings mark only the 13th time in 72 polls that the sitting president was not voted most admired man. The results come as President Trump’s national approval rating hovers in the low to mid-40s.

The poll’s results were divided along partisan lines, with a plurality of Democrats voting for the Obamas and a plurality of Republicans polling for the Trumps.

Gallup, which first conducted this poll in 1946 and has done so every year since, except 1976, surveyed 1,025 adults from Dec. 3-12. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.