Michelle Obama knocks Hillary Clinton from most-admired women perch: Gallup

Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama weighs in on Trump, 'Squad' feud: 'Not my America or your America. It's our America' Poll: Michelle Obama most admired woman in the world Former Michelle Obama aide calls for 'honest conversation' about immigration MORE has topped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMatt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' What to expect when Mueller testifies: Not much McConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch MORE as America’s most admired woman in Gallup's annual poll, marking the first time in 17 years the former presidential candidate and secretary of State did not top the list.

About 15 percent of Americans surveyed picked Obama as their most admired woman, followed by 5 percent for Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyPoll: Michelle Obama most admired woman in the world The Hill's Morning Report - 2020 jitters hit both parties in the Senate Marianne Williamson knocks Vogue for not including her in photo shoot of women running for president MORE and 4 percent each for Clinton and current first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpTrump talks to Swedish leader about rapper A$AP Rocky, offers to vouch for his bail Trump steps up attacks on 'Squad' after post-rally furor Trump says he doesn't care if attacks on 'Squad' hurt him politically MORE.

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Among the men, former President Obama took the title of most admired with 19 percent of the vote. Nearly 13 percent picked President TrumpDonald John TrumpUS-Saudi Arabia policy needs a dose of 'realpolitik' Trump talks to Swedish leader about rapper A$AP Rocky, offers to vouch for his bail Matt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' MORE

Others on the most admired women list include Queen Elizabeth II, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyAmerican women can have it all State denies report ex-spokeswoman received Fox salary while in administration Trump rules out Haley joining 2020 ticket MORE, human rights activist Malala Yousafzai and House Democratic leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump telling aides to look at potential spending cuts if he wins reelection: report Budget talks between White House, Pelosi spill into weekend Trump says he won't watch Mueller testimony MORE (Calif.).

Other men included on the list are former President George W. Bush, Pope Francis, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersGabbard arrives in Puerto Rico to 'show support' amid street protests Democratic strategist predicts most 2020 candidates will drop out in late fall Sanders unveils plan to guarantee the 'right to a secure retirement' MORE (I), former President Clinton, the Dalai Lama, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden compares Trump to George Wallace Sanders unveils plan to guarantee the 'right to a secure retirement' CNN Democratic debate drawing finishes third in cable news ratings race MORE, Tesla CEO Elon MuskElon Reeve MuskHillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp A lot has changed since Apollo 11 — how will we experience the next moon landing? Elon Musk plans to implant devices into brains as early as next year MORE and Vice President Pence.

Former President Obama’s ranking, his 11th at the top of the list, puts him just one first-place finish short of tying Dwight Eisenhower for the most times being picked as the country’s most admired man.

This year’s rankings mark only the 13th time in 72 polls that the sitting president was not voted most admired man. The results come as President Trump’s national approval rating hovers in the low to mid-40s.

The poll’s results were divided along partisan lines, with a plurality of Democrats voting for the Obamas and a plurality of Republicans polling for the Trumps.

Gallup, which first conducted this poll in 1946 and has done so every year since, except 1976, surveyed 1,025 adults from Dec. 3-12. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.