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Michelle Obama knocks Hillary Clinton from most-admired women perch: Gallup

Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaGeorge W. Bush: 'It's a problem that Americans are so polarized' they can't imagine him being friends with Michelle Obama The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - US vaccine effort takes hit with Johnson & Johnson pause Biden, Obamas and celebrity guests announce coronavirus vaccination TV special MORE has topped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPelosi on power in DC: 'You have to seize it' Cuba readies for life without Castro Chelsea Clinton: Pics of Trump getting vaccinated would help him 'claim credit' MORE as America’s most admired woman in Gallup's annual poll, marking the first time in 17 years the former presidential candidate and secretary of State did not top the list.

About 15 percent of Americans surveyed picked Obama as their most admired woman, followed by 5 percent for Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyPrince Harry, William leave their grandfather's funeral together Duchess Meghan sends handwritten note, wreath for Prince Philip Sharon Osbourne tells Maher she's 'angry' and 'hurt' after departure from 'The Talk' MORE and 4 percent each for Clinton and current first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpFox News's Bret Baier posts vaccination selfie The Memo: Specter of vaccine hesitancy rises after J&J blow Trump says Prince Philip's death an 'irreplaceable loss' for UK MORE.

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Among the men, former President Obama took the title of most admired with 19 percent of the vote. Nearly 13 percent picked President TrumpDonald TrumpHouse votes to condemn Chinese government over Hong Kong Former Vice President Walter Mondale dies at age 93 White House readies for Chauvin verdict MORE

Others on the most admired women list include Queen Elizabeth II, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNikki HaleyThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults now eligible for COVID vaccines Parade of 2024 GOP hopefuls court House conservatives Oddsmakers say Harris, not Biden, most likely to win 2024 nomination, election MORE, human rights activist Malala Yousafzai and House Democratic leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiWhite House readies for Chauvin verdict House GOP's McClain responds to Pelosi calling her 'that woman' GOP struggles to rein in nativism MORE (Calif.).

Other men included on the list are former President George W. Bush, Pope Francis, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Energy: Treasury creates hub to fight climate change through finance | Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez introduce 'Green New Deal for Public Housing' | Don't attack Zoom for its Bernie Sanders federal tax bill Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez introduce 'Green New Deal for Public Housing' MORE (I), former President Clinton, the Dalai Lama, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenObama, Clinton reflect on Mondale's legacy Biden, Harris commend Mondale in paving the way for female VP Mondale in last message to staff: 'Joe in the White House certainly helps' MORE, Tesla CEO Elon MuskElon Reeve MuskNASA picks Elon Musk's SpaceX to build spacecraft for manned moon missions Why does Bernie Sanders want to quash Elon Musk's dreams? Hillicon Valley: Intel heads to resume threats hearing scrapped under Trump | New small business coalition to urge action on antitrust policy | Amazon backs corporate tax hike to pay for infrastructure MORE and Vice President Pence.

Former President Obama’s ranking, his 11th at the top of the list, puts him just one first-place finish short of tying Dwight Eisenhower for the most times being picked as the country’s most admired man.

This year’s rankings mark only the 13th time in 72 polls that the sitting president was not voted most admired man. The results come as President Trump’s national approval rating hovers in the low to mid-40s.

The poll’s results were divided along partisan lines, with a plurality of Democrats voting for the Obamas and a plurality of Republicans polling for the Trumps.

Gallup, which first conducted this poll in 1946 and has done so every year since, except 1976, surveyed 1,025 adults from Dec. 3-12. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.