Michelle Obama knocks Hillary Clinton from most-admired women perch: Gallup

Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaDemocratic convention lineup to include Ocasio-Cortez, Clinton, Warren: reports Michelle Obama and Melinda Gates warn girls' education at risk due to pandemic Michelle Obama on depression: 'I'm doing just fine' MORE has topped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBlumenthal calls for declassification of materials detailing Russian threat to US elections Hillary Clinton roasts NYT's Maureen Dowd over column Hillary Clinton touts student suspended over crowded hallway photo: 'John Lewis would be proud' MORE as America’s most admired woman in Gallup's annual poll, marking the first time in 17 years the former presidential candidate and secretary of State did not top the list.

About 15 percent of Americans surveyed picked Obama as their most admired woman, followed by 5 percent for Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyOprah Magazine buys 26 billboards demanding Louisville police arrests for Breonna Taylor's death Ted Cruz bashes Oprah for 'lecture' on race: 'What utter, racist BS' Oprah honors Breonna Taylor on cover of magazine MORE and 4 percent each for Clinton and current first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate GOP, House Democrats begin battle over trillion bill Melania Trump announces plans to renovate White House Rose Garden Trump tweets photo of himself wearing a mask MORE.

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Among the men, former President Obama took the title of most admired with 19 percent of the vote. Nearly 13 percent picked President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeWine tests negative for coronavirus a second time Several GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders Beirut aftermath poses test for US aid to frustrating ally MORE

Others on the most admired women list include Queen Elizabeth II, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyTennessee primary battle turns nasty for Republicans The 'pitcher of warm spit' — Veepstakes and the fate of Mike Pence On The Trail: The first signs of a post-Trump GOP MORE, human rights activist Malala Yousafzai and House Democratic leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi, Schumer slam Trump executive orders, call for GOP to come back to negotiating table Trump signs executive orders after coronavirus relief talks falter Sunday shows preview: White House, congressional Democrats unable to breach stalemate over coronavirus relief MORE (Calif.).

Other men included on the list are former President George W. Bush, Pope Francis, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Trump team pounces on Biden gaffes The Hill's Campaign Report: US officials say Russia, China are looking to sow discord in election Warren urges investment in child care workers amid pandemic MORE (I), former President Clinton, the Dalai Lama, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden says Trump executive order is 'a reckless war on Social Security' Trump got into testy exchange with top GOP donor Adelson: report Blumenthal calls for declassification of materials detailing Russian threat to US elections MORE, Tesla CEO Elon MuskElon Reeve MuskHearing for Twitter hack suspect Zoom-bombed by porn, rap music Hillicon Valley: NSA warns of new security threats | Teen accused of Twitter hack pleads not guilty | Experts warn of mail-in voting misinformation Florida teen accused of Twitter hack pleads not guilty MORE and Vice President Pence.

Former President Obama’s ranking, his 11th at the top of the list, puts him just one first-place finish short of tying Dwight Eisenhower for the most times being picked as the country’s most admired man.

This year’s rankings mark only the 13th time in 72 polls that the sitting president was not voted most admired man. The results come as President Trump’s national approval rating hovers in the low to mid-40s.

The poll’s results were divided along partisan lines, with a plurality of Democrats voting for the Obamas and a plurality of Republicans polling for the Trumps.

Gallup, which first conducted this poll in 1946 and has done so every year since, except 1976, surveyed 1,025 adults from Dec. 3-12. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.