Michelle Obama knocks Hillary Clinton from most-admired women perch: Gallup

Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaMichelle Obama: 'Treat fear as a challenge' Barack Obama wishes a happy 58th birthday to 'best friend' Michelle The Memo: 2024 chatter reveals Democratic nervousness MORE has topped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats see victory in a voting rights defeat Left laughs off floated changes to 2024 ticket A year into his presidency, Biden is polling at an all-time low MORE as America’s most admired woman in Gallup's annual poll, marking the first time in 17 years the former presidential candidate and secretary of State did not top the list.

About 15 percent of Americans surveyed picked Obama as their most admired woman, followed by 5 percent for Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyPrince Harry and Meghan treat Atlanta's King Center to Black-owned food trucks for MLK Day Dr. Oz calls Fauci a 'petty tyrant,' challenges him to debate Best and worst crisis management in 2021 MORE and 4 percent each for Clinton and current first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpRaskin: Grisham told Jan. 6 panel about 'names that I had not heard before' Grisham says former Trump officials meeting next week 'to try and stop him' Former Trump press secretary to meet Wednesday with Jan. 6 committee MORE.

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Among the men, former President Obama took the title of most admired with 19 percent of the vote. Nearly 13 percent picked President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump lawyers to Supreme Court: Jan. 6 committee 'will not be harmed by delay' Two House Democrats announce they won't seek reelection DiCaprio on climate change: 'Vote for people that are sane' MORE

Others on the most admired women list include Queen Elizabeth II, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNikki HaleyThe 10 Republicans most likely to run for president Will — or should — Kamala Harris become the Spiro Agnew of 2022? Haley has 'positive' meeting with Trump MORE, human rights activist Malala Yousafzai and House Democratic leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTwo-thirds of Americans support banning lawmakers from trading stocks: poll The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Voting rights week for Democrats (again) Watch: Lawmakers, activists, family members call for voting rights legislation on MLK day MORE (Calif.).

Other men included on the list are former President George W. Bush, Pope Francis, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersShame on Biden for his Atlanta remarks — but are we surprised? Overnight Health Care — Biden faces pressure from Democrats on COVID-19 Sanders calls out Manchin, Sinema ahead of filibuster showdown MORE (I), former President Clinton, the Dalai Lama, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMadame Tussauds unveils new Biden and Harris figures US raises concerns about Russian troop movements to Belarus Putin tests a model for invading Ukraine, outwitting Biden's diplomats MORE, Tesla CEO Elon MuskElon Reeve MuskHillicon Valley — States probe the tech giants Equilibrium/Sustainability — Bald eagle comeback impacted by lead poison Tesla puts Cybertruck production on hold until early 2023: report MORE and Vice President Pence.

Former President Obama’s ranking, his 11th at the top of the list, puts him just one first-place finish short of tying Dwight Eisenhower for the most times being picked as the country’s most admired man.

This year’s rankings mark only the 13th time in 72 polls that the sitting president was not voted most admired man. The results come as President Trump’s national approval rating hovers in the low to mid-40s.

The poll’s results were divided along partisan lines, with a plurality of Democrats voting for the Obamas and a plurality of Republicans polling for the Trumps.

Gallup, which first conducted this poll in 1946 and has done so every year since, except 1976, surveyed 1,025 adults from Dec. 3-12. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.