Study: Increasing police forces' diversity does not reduce racial disparity in shootings

Study: Increasing police forces' diversity does not reduce racial disparity in shootings
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Increasing diversity among officers may not be enough alone to lead to lessening racial disparity in police shootings, according to a new study.

The study published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America found no evidence that white officers are more likely to shoot minority civilians than non-white officers.

Instead, the study claims "race-specific crime strongly predicts civilian race." 

The study used a database of more than 900 fatal officer-involved shootings based on information from The Guardian and The Washington Post. 

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Researchers analyzed different factors to try to predict the race of the person shot, The Guardian reports.

Researchers found that in counties where minorities were responsible for higher rates of violent crime, a person fatally shot was 3.7 times more likely to be black 3.3 time more likely to be Hispanic than white, the outlet reported. 

But researchers found no evidence that white officers were more likely to shoot minority groups than officers of color.

The report does say diversifying police forces could have other benefits, such as building trust, but claims it wouldn't "meaningfully reduce" racial disparities in fatal shootings, The Guardian reports. 

“One of our clearest results is that violent crime rates strongly predict the race of a person fatally shot. At a high level, reducing race-specific violent crime should be an effective way to reduce fatal shootings of black and Hispanic adults," the study found, according to The Guardian's report.