Anti-Defamation League reports wave of anti-Semitic plots since Pittsburgh synagogue killings

Anti-Defamation League reports wave of anti-Semitic plots since Pittsburgh synagogue killings
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At least 12 white supremacists have been arrested over alleged plots to attack the Jewish community in the year since the mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) reported Sunday. 

The organization also reported that the U.S. continues to see “record-high” numbers of anti-Semitic incidents across the country. 

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A preliminary report found a total of 780 anti-Semitic incidents recorded in the first six months of 2019. A total of 785 incidents were reported in the same time period in 2018, according to the ADL. 

The shooting in Pittsburgh killed 11 people at the Tree of Life, or L’Simcha, synagogue nearly one year ago. 

Since the Oct. 27, 2018, attack, ADL reports white supremacists have targeted Jewish institutional property on at least 50 occasions. 

The alleged targeted attacks include 12 instances of vandalism using white supremacist symbols, 35 distributions of white supremacist propaganda and at least 30 additional incidents in which individuals of “unknown ideology” committed arson, vandalism or distributed propaganda that “was not explicitly white supremacist in nature” at Jewish institutions. 

“It is horrifying that in the year since the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history, at least a dozen white supremacists were arrested after threatening to target Jewish houses of worship,” said ADL CEO Jonathan A. Greenblatt.

“We are tremendously grateful to local, state and federal law enforcement for taking these cases seriously and preventing further bloodshed against the Jewish community,” he added.

The organization also reported three additional individuals arrested for targeting Jews in 2019 that were not identified as white supremacists, including two the organization said were motivated by Islamist extremist ideology. 

The ADL said its Center on Extremism provided “critical intelligence” to law enforcement leading investigations and directly led to arrests in several cases.