Florida man complains after dialysis center prevents him from bringing Trump cutout to treatment

Florida man complains after dialysis center prevents him from bringing Trump cutout to treatment
© Screenshot/WPBF

A Florida man whose family cannot be with him during his hours-long weekly dialysis treatments is upset with medical staff who say he can't bring a lifesize cutout of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE.

Nelson Gibson of Port St. Lucie, told local ABC affiliate WBPF that he at first only brought a photo of Trump as a comfort item during his treatments.

"It just feels like bringing something from home to make you comfortable," Gibson said.

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No one complained about the photo, according to Gibson. Then he started bringing a small cardboard cutout of himself standing next to Trump, which staff also did not complain about. 

Gibson said he then began bringing a life-size cutout of the president with him to treatment. While he brought the life-size version with him multiple times, he says last Tuesday he faced a complaint from staffers at the Fresenius Kidney Care. 

"They told me it was too much and it wasn't a rally," Gibson told WBPF. 

Gibson complained that the Trump cutout is not disruptive and he does not understand why it is not allowed. He stopped going for treatment over the incident. 

In a statement, Fresenius Kidney Care's spokesperson said the organization strongly supports "the ability of all our patients to express their views."

"While we cannot discuss any specific individual, we strongly support the ability of all our patients to express their views, which includes bringing reasonably sized items into our dialysis centers that do not create safety or infection control issues, or interfere with caregivers on the treatment floor," Brad Puffer said.