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Man accused of smuggling fake coronavirus 'miracle cure' into US

Man accused of smuggling fake coronavirus 'miracle cure' into US
© JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images

A man from the U.K. was charged with introducing fake drugs into the U.S. after being found allegedly selling fake coronavirus remedy kits.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said in a news release that 59-year-old Frank Ludlow was charged with one felony count of introducing mislabeled drugs into interstate commerce. If convicted, he faces a sentence of up to three years in prison.

Ludlow is accused in the news release of smuggling kits into the U.S. that contained a number of substances including "vitamin C, an enzyme mix, potassium thiocyanate, and hydrogen peroxide," which Ludlow then renamed "Trinity Remedy" kits and sold in the U.S. as a supposed cure for the coronavirus.

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There is no known cure for the coronavirus, and Ludlow has been selling fake "miracle" cures in the U.S. since 2017, the release continues. An official with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said that the agency was "aggressively" monitoring the market for products being marketed as cures for coronavirus.

“The FDA is actively and aggressively monitoring for unproven COVID-19 products including those attempting to be imported into the country— as part of our ongoing efforts to protect Americans during this pandemic. Unproven health claims, tests, and medical products can pose serious health risks and may keep people from seeking care or delay necessary medical treatment,” said Catherine Hermsen with the FDA Office of Criminal Investigations.

“The FDA will continue to take appropriate action to protect consumers from bad actors who take advantage of a pandemic to increase their profits while jeopardizing the public health," she added.

Ludlow remains currently detained by authorities in the United Kingdom, where he was reportedly trying to mail more of the kits to the U.S., France and parts of the U.K.