Poll: Majority supports removing Confederate statues from public places

Poll: Majority supports removing Confederate statues from public places
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The majority of voters now say they support removing Confederate statues from public spaces around the country, according to a new survey. 

Fifty-two percent of voters said they support removing such statutes, while just 44 percent oppose removing them, according to a Quinnipiac University Poll survey released Wednesday.

A similar poll from 2017 found just 39 percent supported removing Confederate statues from public spaces, while 50 percent were opposed. 

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Support for removing Confederate statues is heavily split by party, based on the poll. An overwhelming 85 percent of Democrats back the move, and just 11 percent are against it. 

Among Republicans, however, 80 percent said they oppose removing Confederate statues from public spaces and just 14 percent support it, the survey said. 

Independents are more split, with 50 percent saying they support removing Confederate statues and 46 percent saying they oppose doing so. 

Protesters nationwide have been calling for the removal of statues and imagery associated with slavery amid demonstrations over racial inequality and police brutality sparked by the killing of George Floyd. 

In some cities, protesters have toppled statues of Confederate leaders and other historical figures including Christopher Columbus and former President Thomas Jefferson. In other cities and states, officials have slated statues for removal. 

The Quinnipiac poll also found that voters are evenly split on support for renaming military bases that were named after Confederate generals, with 47 percent in favor and the same amount opposed. 

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The support was again split by party, with 81 percent of Democrats voicing support for renaming the bases compared with only 9 percent of Republicans. 

Last week, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump on Kanye West's presidential run: 'He is always going to be for us' Marie Yovanovitch on Vindman retirement: He 'deserved better than this. Our country deserved better than this' Trump says Biden has been 'brainwashed': 'He's been taken over by the radical left' MORE said he “will not even consider” renaming bases named for Confederate leaders after top Pentagon officials indicated recently they are open to the idea. 

The position sets up a clash with Congress, which appears set to include a provision on renaming the bases in the annual National Defense Authorization Act.

The poll surveyed 1,332 self-identified registered voters. It was conducted between June 11-15 and has a margin of error of 2.7 percentage points.