SPONSORED:

Judge extends temporary restraining order against Mary Trump

A New York judge has extended a temporary restraining order against Mary Trump until Monday, a day before the release of her tell-all book about her uncle, President TrumpDonald John TrumpHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Police called after Florida moms refuse to wear face masks at school board meeting about mask policy Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline MORE, and his family.

Judge Hal Greenwald of Dutchess County Supreme Court on Friday extended the order, which was set to expire on Friday, until July 13 and rescheduled a court hearing on the matter to the same day.

Robert Trump, the president’s brother, has sought legal action to prevent Mary Trump from publishing the book, which he claims violates a nondisclosure agreement she signed along with other members of the Trump family.

ADVERTISEMENT

The development does not put off the publication of the book, which publisher Simon & Schuster has set for Tuesday, but it will prevent Mary Trump from promoting the work at least through Monday.

Greenwald had previously issued an order temporarily blocking the publication of the book, but an appeals court later narrowed it, saying it did not apply to the publisher and only to Mary Trump.

Media outlets, including The Hill, reported earlier this week on excerpts of the book, titled, “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man.”

The book offers a damaging portrait of the president, who his niece describes as a narcissist and someone who displayed a penchant for lying and cheating dating back to his early days. The book also describes the president’s father, Fred Trump, as a “high-functioning sociopath” whose neglect and behavior scarred his children.

Robert Trump claims that Mary Trump is violating an NDA she signed in the course of a settlement following litigation over Fred Trump’s estate. The president’s niece has fought the lawsuit, with her lawyers arguing that an effort to block the book’s publication would amount to a violation of her First Amendment rights.