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Amy Coney Barrett signed onto 2006 'right to life' statement in newspaper

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele Trump looks to shore up support in Nebraska NYT: Trump had 7 million in debt mostly tied to Chicago project forgiven MORE’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett added her name to a list supporting a statement in a 2006 newspaper insert opposing “abortion on demand” and supporting the "right to life."

The statement, which appeared in the South Bend Tribune, was sponsored by a group called the Saint Joseph County Right to Life. It reads "We the following citizens of Michiana oppose abortion on demand and support the right to life from fertilization to a natural death."

The organization also placed an ad on the opposite page from the insert that called for putting "an end to the barbaric legacy of Roe v. Wade and restore laws that protect the lives of unborn children."

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The Saint Joseph County Right to Life group was founded in 1972 “in anticipation” of the Supreme Court’s 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade, according to its website. The landmark Supreme Court decision legalized abortion rights.

President Trump said earlier this week that it’s “possible” Barrett could tip the court against the Roe v. Wade decision.

“It's certainly possible," the president said in response to a question during an interview on “Fox & Friends Weekend” over whether a potentially conservative-majority court would “rule on a life issue.”

"And maybe they do it in a different way. Maybe they'd give it back to the states. You just don't know what's going to happen,” Trump said.

During her confirmation for a seat on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 2017, Barrett was asked by Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyBarrett confirmation stokes Democrats' fears over ObamaCare On The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Grassley: Voters should be skeptical of Biden's pledge to not raise middle class taxes MORE (R-Iowa) when it is "proper for a judge to put their religious views above applying the law?"

Barrett responded that "It is never appropriate for a judge to impose that judge's personal convictions whether they derive from faith or anywhere else.”

“As Judge Barrett said on the day she was nominated, ‘A judge must apply the law as written. Judges are not policymakers, and they must be resolute in setting aside any policy views they might hold,’" deputy press secretary Judd Deere said in a statement to The Hill. 
 
Updated: 8:56 p.m.