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51 percent want Barrett seated on Supreme Court: poll

51 percent want Barrett seated on Supreme Court: poll
© Greg Nash

A new Gallup poll released Tuesday finds that 51 percent want to see Judge Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettMcConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report Federal appeals court sides with Texas, Louisiana efforts to cut Planned Parenthood's Medicaid funding The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience MORE confirmed to the Supreme Court.

The Gallup poll also found that 46 percent of adults oppose Barrett’s confirmation, while 3 percent do not have an opinion on her filling the seat left vacant by the death of Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgMcConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report COVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries Defusing the judicial confirmation process MORE last month. 

The survey was conducted from Sept. 30 to Oct. 15, beginning four days after President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Republican John James concedes in Michigan Senate race MORE officially nominated the conservative appeals court judge and ending on the same day Senate Judiciary Committee hearings concluded. 

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Tuesday’s poll about Barret, the twelfth Supreme Court nominee for whom Gallup has measured support among the public since 1987, also found that support for Barrett's confirmation is higher than either of Trump's two previous nominees— Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchCOVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries Defusing the judicial confirmation process Reinvesting in American leadership MORE and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughCOVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries Defusing the judicial confirmation process The magnificent moderation of Susan Collins MORE— had at any point in time prior to their confirmations. 

However, the percentage of those who do not want to see Barrett’s confirmation is higher than it has been in any of the initial public opinion polls for the 11 previous nominees. 

According to Gallup, the percentage of respondents with no opinion on Barrett filling the seat is much lower than for prior nominees, with an average of 25 percent of those surveyed in the past generally having no particular leaning for or against the Supreme Court picks immediately after the president’s nomination. 

The percentage with no opinion on Barrett is also significantly lower than the average 22 percent found in the final measurement before the confirmations of the previous eight justices. 

Gallup cited multiple possible explanations for the polling results, including the fact that the nomination process is occurring amidst a presidential election in which millions of voters have already cast their ballots. Democrats have used this fact to oppose Barrett’s nomination, referencing when Republicans in 2016 refused to hold hearings for President Obama's nominee, Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandMcConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report Feinstein to step down as top Democrat on Judiciary Committee The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Calls mount to start transition as Biden readies Cabinet picks MORE, roughly eight months before the general election. 

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Polling from other organizations has shown that a majority of Americans would rather see a person nominated to the court after the Nov. 3 election, with the winner of the presidency and the new Senate nominating and voting on a Supreme Court pick. 

These findings come as the Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on Barrett’s nomination on Thursday, with Republicans planning on holding a final Senate vote on Monday, Oct. 26, roughly a week before elections.

On Monday, Republicans struck down an effort led by Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Voters say Biden should make coronavirus vaccine a priority: poll New York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn MORE (D-N.Y.) to adjourn the Senate until after the election, which would have effectively moved Barrett's confirmation until after Election Day. 

Only one Republican senator, Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTwo more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (Maine), has said she will vote against Barrett because she does not believe a nominee should be brought forth before the presidential election.