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Roberts to administer judicial oath to Barrett Tuesday

Roberts to administer judicial oath to Barrett Tuesday
© Greg Nash

Chief Justice John Roberts will administer the judicial oath to Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettMcConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report Federal appeals court sides with Texas, Louisiana efforts to cut Planned Parenthood's Medicaid funding The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience MORE on Tuesday following her confirmation to the Supreme Court on Monday evening.

The Supreme Court announced that Roberts will give the judicial oath to Barrett in a private ceremony Tuesday after she was officially confirmed by the Senate in a 52-48 vote. 

“Upon administration of that oath, she will be able to begin to participate in the work of the Court,” the Supreme Court release states.

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Barrett will be recognized in a formal ceremony at a special sitting of the Supreme Court “at a later date.” 

The judicial oath will follow the constitutional oath that Justice Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasDefusing the judicial confirmation process Will the Supreme Court take ObamaCare off life-support? The overlooked significance Kamala Harris brought to the Biden-Harris ticket MORE will administer Monday night to swear in Barrett as a justice. Thomas will swear-in Barrett at a ceremony at the White House, prompting questions from some about the safety of the event. 

Barrett’s confirmation solidifies the Supreme Court’s 6-3 conservative majority. She became the first justice in modern history to be confirmed without bipartisan support after no Democrats voted for her; only Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTwo more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (R-Maine) crossed party lines to vote against her confirmation. 

The judicial oath ceremony will come a week before Election Day.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Republican John James concedes in Michigan Senate race MORE nominated Barrett to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgMcConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report COVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries Defusing the judicial confirmation process MORE about a week after her death last month. Senate Republicans pushed to get Barrett’s confirmation done before the election despite pushback from Democrats. 

Democrats called foul after GOP Senate leaders blocked then-President Obama’s nominee Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandMcConnell pushed Trump to nominate Barrett on the night of Ginsburg's death: report Feinstein to step down as top Democrat on Judiciary Committee The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Calls mount to start transition as Biden readies Cabinet picks MORE’s confirmation hearings in 2016, nine months ahead of the election. Republicans have argued this circumstance is different because the GOP controls both the Senate and White House. 

The last time a Supreme Court vacancy was filled in an election year was 1916, and the latest election year confirmation before Barrett was in July.