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Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg
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Newly confirmed Justice Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettAlito to far-right litigants: The buffet is open Hispanics shock Democrats in deep blue California COVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries MORE will use the Supreme Court chambers formerly occupied by the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgCOVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries Defusing the judicial confirmation process Conservative justices help save ObamaCare — for now MORE, a court spokesperson said Tuesday.

The court also said Ginsburg’s five law clerks are now working for Justices Stephen BreyerStephen BreyerWill the Supreme Court take ObamaCare off life-support? Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Barrett's baptism by fire: Protecting the integrity of elections MORE, Sonia SotomayorSonia SotomayorWill the Supreme Court take ObamaCare off life-support? Supreme Court grapples over Catholic organization's fight against nondiscrimination law Girl Scouts spark backlash from left after congratulating Justice Amy Coney Barrett MORE and Elena KaganElena KaganCOVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries Will the Supreme Court take ObamaCare off life-support? How recent Supreme Court rulings will impact three battleground states MORE.

Barrett officially became the nation’s newest justice Tuesday when she took the judicial oath, administered by Chief Justice John Roberts, during a private ceremony.

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She immediately came under political pressure when she was asked by a county in Pennsylvania to recuse herself from participating in a dispute over the state's mail-ballot extension.

The Senate voted 52-48 on Monday to confirm Barrett to fill the vacancy left by Ginsburg following the liberal stalwart’s death from cancer on Sept. 18.

Barrett is the first justice in modern history to be confirmed without bipartisan support, underscoring Democratic frustration with the GOP push to confirm her and misgivings about her judicial philosophy.

As a staunch conservative, Barrett is expected to cement a 6-3 conservative majority on the court.