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Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg
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Newly confirmed Justice Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Supreme Court unanimously sides with Catholic adoption agency that turned away same-sex couples MORE will use the Supreme Court chambers formerly occupied by the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgOcasio-Cortez says Breyer should retire from Supreme Court Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Juan Williams: Time for Justice Breyer to go MORE, a court spokesperson said Tuesday.

The court also said Ginsburg’s five law clerks are now working for Justices Stephen BreyerStephen BreyerOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Supreme Court upholds ObamaCare in 7-2 ruling MORE, Sonia SotomayorSonia SotomayorCongress must act to correct flaws in the First Step Act Biden's bad run: Is he doing worse in the courts than Trump? Five takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision MORE and Elena KaganElena KaganFive takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Supreme Court upholds ObamaCare in 7-2 ruling Supreme Court confounding its partisan critics MORE.

Barrett officially became the nation’s newest justice Tuesday when she took the judicial oath, administered by Chief Justice John Roberts, during a private ceremony.

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She immediately came under political pressure when she was asked by a county in Pennsylvania to recuse herself from participating in a dispute over the state's mail-ballot extension.

The Senate voted 52-48 on Monday to confirm Barrett to fill the vacancy left by Ginsburg following the liberal stalwart’s death from cancer on Sept. 18.

Barrett is the first justice in modern history to be confirmed without bipartisan support, underscoring Democratic frustration with the GOP push to confirm her and misgivings about her judicial philosophy.

As a staunch conservative, Barrett is expected to cement a 6-3 conservative majority on the court.