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Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg
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Newly confirmed Justice Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettBill introduced to create RBG monument on Capitol Hill Supreme Court faces landmark challenge on voting rights The Jan. 6 case for ending the Senate filibuster MORE will use the Supreme Court chambers formerly occupied by the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgBill introduced to create RBG monument on Capitol Hill Kavanaugh dismays conservatives by dodging pro-Trump election lawsuits McConnell backs Garland for attorney general MORE, a court spokesperson said Tuesday.

The court also said Ginsburg’s five law clerks are now working for Justices Stephen BreyerStephen BreyerSupreme Court weighs police power to conduct warrantless searches A powerful tool to take on the Supreme Court — if Democrats use it right Supreme Court clears way for extradition of alleged Ghosn escape plotters MORE, Sonia SotomayorSonia SotomayorJustices hear sparring over scope of safeguards for minority voters Judge whose son was killed by gunman says Sotomayor also targeted A powerful tool to take on the Supreme Court — if Democrats use it right MORE and Elena KaganElena KaganGOP lawyer tells Supreme Court curtailing Sunday voting lawful A powerful tool to take on the Supreme Court — if Democrats use it right Supreme Court grants Alabama death row inmate's request for pastor MORE.

Barrett officially became the nation’s newest justice Tuesday when she took the judicial oath, administered by Chief Justice John Roberts, during a private ceremony.

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She immediately came under political pressure when she was asked by a county in Pennsylvania to recuse herself from participating in a dispute over the state's mail-ballot extension.

The Senate voted 52-48 on Monday to confirm Barrett to fill the vacancy left by Ginsburg following the liberal stalwart’s death from cancer on Sept. 18.

Barrett is the first justice in modern history to be confirmed without bipartisan support, underscoring Democratic frustration with the GOP push to confirm her and misgivings about her judicial philosophy.

As a staunch conservative, Barrett is expected to cement a 6-3 conservative majority on the court.