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Atlanta mayor urges fans not to travel to 'made-for-TV' NBA All-Star Game

Atlanta mayor urges fans not to travel to 'made-for-TV' NBA All-Star Game
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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance BottomsKeisha Lance BottomsAtlanta mayor issues order to expand ballot access Chelsea Clinton gets her own podcast Biden: Georgia law is 'Jim Crow in the 21st century' MORE tweeted on Wednesday that the NBA All-Star game is a “made-for-TV event”  that fans should not plan to attend in person in the city.

Under normal circumstances we’d be grateful for the opportunity to host the NBA All-Star game, but this isn’t a typical year,” Bottoms said. “I’ve shared my concerns w/ @NBA & @ATLHawks & agree this is a made-for-TV event only & people shouldn’t travel to Atlanta to party.”

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The game scheduled for March 7 will not be open to the public  but some vaccinated healthcare workers and limited guests of the players are allowed to watch in person, ESPN reported

Bottoms told local businesses “not to host events in the city related to this game” in order to deter from large gatherings.

The NBA All-Star game is one of many events that had to limit its attendance this past year in order to curb the spread of the coronavirus. 

This game will be more limited than the Super Bowl in Tampa, Florida, which  was allowed to sell some tickets and have some fans.

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Players and their guests that attend the NBA All-Star game will have to travel by private plane or car. Players will also not be allowed to leave their hotels except to go to the arena, according to ESPN. 

Some NBA players are not happy about the decision to have the All-Star game as their season has already been severely impacted by the coronavirus. 

Although the NBA has been trying to promote coronavirus vaccines during the pandemic, many players have been apprehensive about promoting and getting the vaccine.