Fewer than 4 in 10 say US is on right track: poll

Fewer than 4 in 10 say US is on right track: poll
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A new poll found that fewer than 40 percent of Americans say the country is headed in the "right direction," adding to recent surveys that show declining support for President BidenJoe BidenPressure grows for breakthrough in Biden agenda talks State school board leaves national association saying they called parents domestic terrorists Sunday shows preview: Supply chain crisis threaten holiday sales; uncertainty over whether US can sustain nationwide downward trend in COVID-19 cases MORE.

The Morning Consult/Politico survey released Wednesday found that only 38 percent of Americans say the country is on the right track, compared to 62 percent who said it's moving in the wrong direction.

The survey also showed Biden's approval at 46 percent, with 51 percent disapproving of his job performance.

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The results fell in between a CNN survey published Wednesday, which put Biden's approval rating at 50 percent, and a Quinnipiac poll from last week that found just 38 percent of respondents approved of Biden's performance.

Nearly 50 percent of GOP respondents in the Morning Consult/Politico survey said they would vote for former President TrumpDonald TrumpMcAuliffe takes tougher stance on Democrats in Washington Democrats troll Trump over Virginia governor's race Tom Glavine, Ric Flair, Doug Flutie to join Trump for Herschel Walker event MORE if the 2024 Republican primary were held today. The next closest potential candidate was Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisThe CDC's Title 42 order fuels racism and undermines public health Chicago sues police union over refusal to comply with vaccine mandate Crist says as Florida governor he would legalize marijuana, expunge criminal records MORE (R), at 15 percent.

Meanwhile, more than 80 percent of Democratic respondents said they would vote for President Biden in the 2024 Democratic presidential primary if it were held today.

The survey was conducted among 1,999 registered voters from Oct. 8-11. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.