Thune mocks Obama rhetoric, campaign push instead of focus on job creation

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate barrels toward showdown over Trump's court picks Bipartisan Senate bill would penalize illegal robocalls Hillicon Valley: Russian-linked hackers may have impersonated US officials | Trump signs DHS cyber bill | Prosecutors inadvertently reveal charges against Assange | Accenture workers protest border enforcement work | App mines crypto for bail bonds MORE (R-S.D.) needled President Obama's campaigning on behalf of Democrats in the Republican weekly radio address, mocking the president on his campaign rhetoric.

Thune, a member of the Senate GOP leadership who may challenge Obama in the 2012 presidential election, posed the quintessential question for a party trying to unseat incumbents.

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"I would like to suggest a simple question people should ask themselves to help cut through all the talk: Are you better off today than you were two years ago?" Thune said Saturday.

Thune sought to undercut Obama's message on the campaign trail in the closing days of the campaign, focusing on the job losses Democrats have suffered over the past two years. He asserted that the president should be more focused on job creation than on re-electing Democrats.

“But if the conversations I’ve had with voters are any indication, the president should spend less time campaigning to save the jobs of Democrats in Congress, and more time trying to create jobs for the American people," he said. “The Obama Experiment has failed."


Republicans are looking to keep the election focused on jobs and the economy before voters head to the polls on Nov. 2. Thune, a top Republican figure, focused on the GOP alternatives the party has proposed to legislation favored by Democrats and the president.

He also mocked a frequent refrain from Obama on the campaign trail, in which the president says that people put a car in "D" to "drive forward" symbolize "Democrats," versus when drivers put a car in "R" to "reverse" to symbolize "Republicans."

“The president likes to say that when you want to drive forward you put your car in D, and when you want to go in reverse you put it in R," Thune said. "It’s a clever line, but when you’re speeding toward a cliff, you don’t want to keep the car in drive."