McConnell: 'We look a lot like Greece already'

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP, Kavanaugh accuser struggle to reach deal GOP making counteroffer to Kavanaugh accuser The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump questions Kavanaugh accuser's account | Accuser may testify Thursday | Midterm blame game begins MORE (Ky.) said Wednesday that the financial state of the U.S. is similar to bankrupt Greece.

Making the case for major spending reductions a day before congressional leaders will meet with President Obama, McConnell said, "We look a lot like Greece already."

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During their weekly press breifing, other Senate Republican leaders lashed out at Obama, questioning his leadership on the debt-ceiling talks.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoTrump privately calls Mattis ‘Moderate Dog’: report Push to change wildlife act sparks lobbying blitz House and Senate negotiators reach agreement on water infrastructure bill MORE (R-Wyo.) said, "We need a serious discussion and we're not getting it yet."

Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) pushed back at Democrats' criticism of the GOP's insistence of no tax increases. He said the party's position is not one of "ideological fervor," but instead an effort to foster more jobs.

Pressed on House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorFake political signs target Democrat in Virginia Hillicon Valley: GOP leader wants Twitter CEO to testify on bias claims | Sinclair beefs up lobbying during merger fight | Facebook users experience brief outage | South Korea eyes new taxes on tech Sinclair hired GOP lobbyists after FCC cracked down on proposed Tribune merger MORE's (R-Va.) willingness to look at closing tax loopholes, McConnell noted his support for comprehensive tax reform.

In a nuanced break from Cantor, McConnell said any effort to "cherry pick" tax loopholes as part of the debt-ceiling talks would be "pretty challenging."

McConnell stressed that he and other Republican leaders in the Senate want a long-term deal on the debt ceiling. That remark came days after McConnell and his lieutenants signaled they were open to a short-term agreement.

Obama on Tuesday strongly endorsed a long-term deal.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidKavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow Dems can’t ‘Bork’ Kavanaugh, and have only themselves to blame Dem senator: Confidential documents would 'strongly bolster' argument against Kavanaugh's nomination MORE (D-Nev.), who usually addresses the media before Senate Republican leaders every week when the upper chamber is in session, did not hold a press conference Wednesday afternoon.