GOP gets ObamaCare angst

Anxious Senate Republicans are worried party leaders are focusing too much this election year on ObamaCare and not enough on jobs and the economy.

The concern among GOP centrists comes as President Obama and congressional Democrats are crowing about a surge in late enrollments and claiming the political winds are shifting around the Affordable Care Act.

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A growing rift in the GOP was exposed when a group of Senate Republicans recently struck a bipartisan deal to extend unemployment benefits. Neither Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerTrump appears alongside Ocasio-Cortez on Time 100 list Resurrecting deliberative bodies Trump's decision on health care law puts spotlight on Mulvaney MORE (R-Ohio) nor Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems prep for Mueller report's release McConnell touts Trump support, Supreme Court fights in reelection video Why Ken Cuccinelli should be Trump's choice for DHS MORE (R-Ky.) embraced the agreement.

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE (R-Nev.), who spearheaded efforts to find a compromise on jobless benefits, said, “It’s my opinion that the Affordable Care Act is going to play in this election, but I don’t think it’s the main issue. I think the main issue is going to be the economy and jobs.

“If we have solutions and answers on the economy and jobs, I think that the Affordable Care Act will take a back seat to it. If we think we’re going to win or lose the majority based on one single piece of legislation ... I think we’re mistaken.”

The error-plagued ObamaCare rollout and the president’s broken promise that people could keep their healthcare plans has helped put Republicans in a strong position to seize the Senate.

But some Republicans, including a senator who requested anonymity, fear the issue’s potency could fade following the March 31 enrollment deadline as news media move to other stories.

“It’s got to be a much broader appeal than one piece of legislation,” said Heller, who isn’t up for reelection in 2014.

Heller’s comments are strikingly similar to those from Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer slams Justice Dept over 'pre-damage control' on Mueller report Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders welcomes fight with Trump over 'Medicare for all' | DOJ attorney in ObamaCare case leaving | NYC mayor defends vaccination mandate | Ohio gov signs 'heartbeat' abortion bill Dems see room for Abrams in crowded presidential field MORE (N.Y.) and other Democrats who say voters are not as focused on ObamaCare as Republicans believe.

Heller joined Republican Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Collins receives more donations from Texas oil, gas industry than from Maine residents | Interior chief left meetings off schedule | Omar controversy jeopardizes Ocasio-Cortez trip to coal mine Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Collins receives more donations from Texas fossil fuel industry than from Maine residents MORE (Maine), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP senator wears shirt honoring Otto Warmbier at Korean DMZ On The Money: Conservatives rally behind Moore for Fed | White House interviewing other candidates | Trump, Dems spar on Tax Day | Budget watchdogs bemoan 'debt denialism' The Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday MORE (Ohio), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiCain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed License to discriminate: Religious exemption laws are trampling rights in rural America On The Money — Presented by Job Creators Network — Cain expected to withdraw from Fed consideration, report says | Dem bill directs IRS to create free online filing service | Trump considered Ivanka for World Bank MORE (Alaska) and Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThe global reality behind 'local' problems Dems vow swift action on gun reform next year This week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill MORE (Ill.) to negotiate a five-month extension of unemployment benefits with Democrats.

While Republican leaders talk often about the slowness of the economic recovery, they frequently do so in the context of ObamaCare.

“The president’s healthcare plan has such broad-based impact, it’s hard to escape that as an overriding issue, whether it’s the impact it’s had on part-time work or the impact it’s had on people deciding not to hire back and fill positions,” said Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntHillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech Lawmakers, tech set for clash over AI Overnight Health Care: CEO of largest private health insurer slams 'Medicare for All' plans | Dem bill targets youth tobacco use | CVS fined over fake painkiller prescriptions | Trump, first lady to discuss opioid crisis at summit MORE (Mo.), vice chairman of the Senate Republican Conference.

Many Republicans claim ObamaCare is a gift that keeps giving, saying experts predict premiums will skyrocket in coming months and years. House GOP lawmakers hope to unveil an Affordable Care Act replacement later this year.

After months of getting pummeled over the law’s botched implementation, Democrats say the tide is beginning to turn in their favor.

The White House on Tuesday touted the enrollment of more than 7 million people, a figure that seemed unattainable mere months ago. Republicans counter that millions lost their healthcare coverage last year because of ObamaCare mandates.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidSanders courts GOP voters with 'Medicare for All' plan Glamorization of the filibuster must end Schumer won't rule out killing filibuster MORE (D-Nev.) played offense Tuesday on ObamaCare, a topic he usually avoids.

“We all know about the early setbacks with the rollout of ObamaCare, but here it is today; we have a number that no one thought we could arrive at a few months ago,” Reid said in introductory remarks at a press conference. “People are hungry for the benefits of this law.”

GOP strategists warn party leaders not to put all their eggs into the ObamaCare basket if they want to capture as many Democratic seats as possible in November.

“Republicans need to be very careful to sketch out a positive vision for the fall as part of their election strategy. If they’re viewed as too focused on ObamaCare and saying bad things about Obama-Care, it’s a very dour message and not likely to bring over swing voters,” said John Ullyot, a former Senate aide and GOP strategist.

Ullyot said swing voters want to see a positive agenda, adding, “It may be that ObamaCare is less of a negative six months from now than it is today.”

Collins, who is seeking reelection in a Democratic-leaning state, has sought compromise with Democrats on raising the minimum wage to a level below the $10.10 an hour sought by Obama.

In doing so, the senator has broken with McConnell, who has ruled out a boost to the minimum wage as a job killer.

Republican operatives say GOP leaders would be wise to shift some of their emphasis away from ObamaCare now that the enrollment deadline has passed.

Ron Bonjean, a GOP strategist and former Senate and House leadership aide, said, “The narrative will likely change somewhat toward the economy once again. ObamaCare will be front and center between now and the election, but the intensity will go down, leaving Republicans a chance to talk about what they would do differently with the economy.”

McConnell on Tuesday focused on the economy, urging Reid to allow votes on Republican amendments to spur job creation.

“While Senate Democrats dust off the same poll-tested ideas for papering over the symptoms of malaise, Republicans are proposing concrete ideas aimed at igniting the economy and giving people real hope for something more, something better than what they’ve been getting for the last five years, something that speaks to their hopes and potential,” McConnell said on the floor.

McConnell, who faces a primary and general election challenge, offered an amendment to the pending unemployment benefits package that would stop what he calls the administration’s “war on coal.”

This article was updated at 10:20 a.m.