Reid: GOP border bill could be vehicle for immigration reform

Reid: GOP border bill could be vehicle for immigration reform
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidWhite House seeks to shield Biden from GOP attacks on crime issue Lobbying world Warner backing 'small carve-out' on filibuster for voting rights MORE (D-Nev.) said Tuesday that if the House passes a $659 million border bill with policy changes, he could use it as a vehicle for comprehensive immigration reform.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerGOP up in arms over Cheney, Kinzinger Freedom Caucus presses McCarthy to force vote to oust Pelosi Stripping opportunity from DC's children MORE (R-Ohio) is trying to round up enough votes for a pared-down border bill that spends far below the president’s request for $3.7 billion and includes policy changes to speed the deportation of illegal minors from Central America.

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Reid said the policy changes would give him an opportunity to attach the comprehensive immigration reform bill that the Senate passed last year with the support of 14 Republicans.

“If they pass that, maybe it’s an opening for us to have a conference on our comprehensive immigration reform. If they’re finally sending us something on immigration, maybe we can do that,” Reid told reporters after a lunch meeting with his caucus.  

“We’ve been looking for something to do a conference on. Maybe we can do it with that,” Reid said.

Reid’s statement delivers a blow to BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerGOP up in arms over Cheney, Kinzinger Freedom Caucus presses McCarthy to force vote to oust Pelosi Stripping opportunity from DC's children MORE’s efforts to persuade conservatives in his conference to vote for the bill.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzBiden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet 228 Republican lawmakers urge Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade GOP, Democrats battle over masks in House, Senate MORE (R-Texas) met with more than 20 House conservatives last week to warn them that passing legislation addressing the Texas border crisis could come back to haunt them. He said Reid would likely either bury the bill in the Senate or overhaul it and potentially use it as a vehicle to pass elements of the Senate’s comprehensive reform.

The House has not taken any floor action on immigration reform legislation this year. Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingGOP brawls over Trump on eve of first Jan. 6 hearing Pence to visit Iowa to headline event for congressman Former Steve King challenger on rural voters in GOP states: 'They hate Democrats' MORE (R-Iowa), an outspoken opponent of granting legal status to illegal immigrants, has warned any bill could be used as a vehicle for creating a pathway to citizenship for millions of them.

The pending House border bill includes changes to a 2008 trafficking victims protection law that would allow immigration authorities to speed the deportation of children seeking asylum from Central America.

It would deploy National Guard troops to the southern border and increase funding for immigration judges to shorten the timeline for processing unaccompanied minors from noncontiguous countries. 

The Republican co-authors of the 2013 Senate immigration bill rebutted Reid’s comments Tuesday evening and accused him of trying to blow up House legislation that would limit the legal rights of unaccompanied immigrant children.

“It is obvious that Majority Leader Reid’s suggestion that the Senate could include comprehensive immigration reform in its border crisis bill is a blatant attempt to scuttle House Republicans’ good-faith efforts to pass legislation addressing the issue this week,” Republican Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain to produce 'Don't Sweat the Small Stuff' Lifetime movie starring Heather Locklear An August ultimatum: No recess until redistricting reform is done Meghan McCain on Pelosi, McCarthy fight: 'I think they're all bad' MORE (Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham, Cuellar press Biden to name border czar Trump takes two punches from GOP The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands MORE (S.C.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate holds sleepy Saturday session as negotiators finalize infrastructure deal Break glass in case of emergency — but not for climate change Democrats join GOP in pressuring Biden over China, virus origins MORE (Fla.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden nominates former Sen. Tom Udall as New Zealand ambassador Biden to nominate Jane Hartley as UK ambassador: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Voting rights will be on '22, '24 ballots MORE (Ariz.) said in a joint statement.

The four Republican members of the Gang of Eight, which hammered out the framework of the comprehensive bill, pledged to oppose any effort by Reid to attach it to pending border legislation.

“Without our support – which he would not have – it would be impossible for Leader Reid to add comprehensive immigration reform or the DREAM Act to any border crisis bill this week,” they wrote.

The DREAM Act would grant legal status to children who came to the country illegally at a young age and have remained as residents in good standing.