Republicans at odds over immigration

Republicans at odds over immigration

Senate and House Republicans are fighting over who should move first to break the stalemate over funding the Department of Homeland Security.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Tuesday the House will have to pass a new bill because the Senate can’t pass the House’s initial legislation, which would overturn President Obama’s executive actions on immigration shielding millions from deportation.

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“The next move obviously is up to the House,” he told reporters following a conference meeting.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLongtime House parliamentarian to step down Five things we learned from this year's primaries Bad blood between Pelosi, Meadows complicates coronavirus talks MORE’s (R-Ohio) office pushed back, arguing there is “little point in additional House action.”

McConnell’s and BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLongtime House parliamentarian to step down Five things we learned from this year's primaries Bad blood between Pelosi, Meadows complicates coronavirus talks MORE’s offices both put the blame on Senate Democrats, who have repeatedly blocked the House bill from progressing by filibustering procedural motions.

Sixty votes would be needed to move the House bill forward, and Republicans have won no more than 53.

“It’s clear we can’t get on the bill. We can’t offer amendments to the bill. And I think it would be pretty safe to say we’re stuck because of Democratic obstruction on the Senate side,” McConnell said.

Michael Steel, Boehner’s spokesman, said “the pressure is on Senate Democrats” who claim to oppose Obama’s immigration action but “are filibustering a bill to stop it.”

Senate Democrats and the White House are showing no signs that they are feeling any pressure.

Funding for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is scheduled to end after Feb. 27, and Democrats say Republicans are jeopardizing the nation’s security with a fight over a policy issue. They are demanding the GOP agree to a clean funding bill stripped of measures attacking Obama’s immigration actions.

“The Republican majority is twiddling its thumbs as it gets closer and closer to shutting down DHS,” said Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerCruz blocks amended resolution honoring Ginsburg over language about her dying wish Senate Democrats introduce legislation to probe politicization of pandemic response Schumer interrupted during live briefing by heckler: 'Stop lying to the people' MORE (D-N.Y.). “We Democrats have pushed for a clean DHS funding bill followed by a robust debate on immigration reform. But the Republicans have insisted on sticking to their hostage-taking tactics.”

Rank-and-file Republicans echoed the comments from their leaders, suggesting the impasse is likely to extend until after next week’s congressional recess. Congress would then return to Washington the week of Feb. 23 with only five working days to reach a solution.

Asked about McConnell’s remarks, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteNo documents? Hoping for legalization? Be wary of Joe Biden Press: Trump's final presidential pardon: himself USCIS chief Cuccinelli blames Paul Ryan for immigration inaction MORE (R-Va.) told The Hill: “We’ve acted. We’ve acted.”

But Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeHow fast population growth made Arizona a swing state Jeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Republican former Michigan governor says he's voting for Biden MORE (R-Ariz.) said the House needs to send legislation to the Senate that has a chance of passing, saying it’s “a matter of arithmetic.”

“My view is we would be much better off actually debating immigration legislation than debating this spending bill,” he said.

Republicans last week made a point of showing the House they were trying to pass their bill.

For three days in a row, the GOP brought the House bill to the floor. On all three occasions, it failed.

Senate GOP leaders expressed some frustration with their House brethren.

“They’d like to leave the hot potato with us and I think we’ve made pretty clear that we’ve tried our best and the math doesn’t work,” said Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Campaign Report: GOP set to ask SCOTUS to limit mail-in voting Liberal super PAC launches ads targeting vulnerable GOP senators over SCOTUS fight Senate GOP faces pivotal moment on pick for Supreme Court MORE (Texas).

 “The question is, what does the House need in order to pass something. We’ve had three cloture votes. It’s not clear to me that a fourth, fifth or sixth cloture vote is going to move the needle,” he added.

Republicans have vowed not to allow a partial shutdown, but the chances for one are growing by the day. GOP senators say a short-term continuing resolution appears the most likely scenario to avoid a shutdown.

Such a scenario would punt the debate for a month, allowing more time for lawmakers to hash out a new deal out — even if a consensus appears unlikely, GOP senators said.

Still, it’s not entirely clear that a short-term measure would pass the House. Conservatives opposed to a clean bill that does nothing to attack Obama on immigration could reject it, as could Democrats who want a clean bill funding the agency through the end of the year.

The bet on a short-term measure, however, would be that enough lawmakers will want to avoid an agency shutdown.

Scott Wong contributed.