Senate edges away from DHS shutdown

Senate edges away from DHS shutdown
© Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Congress appeared to step back from the brink of a partial government shutdown Wednesday as the Senate voted overwhelmingly to move forward with a clean bill funding the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

The Senate opened debate on the bill in a 98-2 vote after Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcGrath reshuffles campaign in home stretch to Senate election GOP senator draws fire from all sides on Biden, Obama-era probes Chris Wallace rips both parties for coronavirus package impasse: 'Pox on both their houses' MORE (R-Ky.) agreed to strip out provisions that would reverse President Obama’s executive actions on immigration. 

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The vote broke a weeks-long stalemate in the upper chamber and appeared to pave the way for passage of the clean bill later this week, potentially as early as Thursday.

But while senators seem eager to stave off a shutdown of the DHS at midnight on Friday, the fate of the bill in the House remains unclear.

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerWary GOP eyes Meadows shift from brick-thrower to dealmaker Bottom line Cheney battle raises questions about House GOP's future MORE (R-Ohio) repeatedly declined to take a position on the bill at a brief press conference, emphasizing that it’s up to the Senate to act on funding.

“Until the Senate does something, we’re in a wait-and-see mode,” BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerWary GOP eyes Meadows shift from brick-thrower to dealmaker Bottom line Cheney battle raises questions about House GOP's future MORE said.

An overwhelming vote in the Senate for the clean bill could strengthen the Speaker’s hand, should he choose to defy conservatives and drop demands for defunding Obama’s immigration order.

A whip list compiled by The Hill indicates a growing split in the House GOP conference over whether to back McConnell’s gambit. Though some conservatives are vocally opposed, many appear ready to let the fight over Obama’s deportation deferrals play out in court.

Democrats, meanwhile, quickly united behind the clean bill.

“We’re going to do everything we can to make sure it passes by an overwhelming vote,” Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidPentagon launches task force to study UFO sightings Pentagon forming task force to investigate military UFO sightings Kamala Harris makes history — as a Westerner MORE (D-Nev.) said.

Congress has only two days left to prevent the DHS from closing down. Should the funding be allowed to lapse, “essential” employees at agencies like the Coast Guard, Secret Service and U.S. Customs Service and Border Protection would work without pay, while thousands of others would be furloughed.

The White House has warned that a Homeland Security shutdown would threaten national security, and on Wednesday amplified its calls for a clean bill funding the department.

“We’re confident that the right thing to do is for Congress to fulfill their responsibility to ensure that the Department of Homeland Security has a budget that allows them to be funded through the end of the year,” White House press secretary Josh Earnest said. “That’s seems like a pretty basic responsibility.”

Boehner is scheduled to hold a press conference Thursday where he could say what he plans to do next.

Should Boehner choose to bring a clean bill to the floor, Democrats would need to deliver a significant number of votes.

Democratic leaders warned that conservatives in the Senate could hold up the funding measure, but staunch opponents of Obama’s immigration action, including Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWhat Biden must do to keep his lead and win Fiorina: Biden picking Harris for VP 'a smart choice' Russian news agency pushed video of Portland protestors burning a Bible: report MORE (R-Texas) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeDavis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Overnight Defense: Air Force general officially becomes first African American service chief | Senators introduce bill to block Trump armed drone sale measure | State Department's special envoy for Iran is departing the Trump administration Senators introduce bill to block Trump armed drone sale measure MORE (R-Utah), voted to advance the bill Wednesday. Sens. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHow would a Biden Justice Department be different? Kamala Harris: The right choice at the right time Three pros and three cons to Biden picking Harris MORE (R-Ala.) and James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeLincoln Project expands GOP target list, winning Trump ire Trump's contempt for advice and consent Senate GOP divided over whether they'd fill Supreme Court vacancy  MORE (R-Okla.) were the only defectors.

A day earlier, Cruz, a potential 2016 presidential candidate, had called McConnell’s new plan a “mistake.”

The timing on a final Senate vote remains unclear. Senate Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynEnough legal games — we need to unleash American energy Three pros and three cons to Biden picking Harris The Hill's 12:30 Report - Speculation over Biden's running mate announcement MORE (R-Texas) said it might not happen until Sunday unless there is unanimous consent.

Still, he appeared confident that a shutdown could be avoided, saying, “I think we’ll meet the deadline.” He declined to say whether a short-term continuing resolution might be needed to keep the DHS open.

“I don’t know what’s going to happen. Depends on the House. It takes us a little longer to act over here because of the Senate rules, so the House can vote pretty quickly,” he said.

House conservatives have other ideas.

Rep. Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksGOP congressman says person responsible for deleted Perdue campaign ad should be 'outed', 'fired' House passes bill establishing commission to study racial disparities affecting Black men, boys Overnight Defense: Army launches command probe after slaying at Fort Hood | 'MAGA' listed as 'covert white supremacy' in military handout MORE (R-Ala.) said “there’s no way on God’s green Earth” he would vote for a funding bill that didn’t defund Obama’s actions. Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.) downplayed the impact of a DHS shutdown, saying it would only result in a “slowdown of the agency.”

“I don’t think there’d be any impact on the day-to-day life of Americans. They’ll wake up the next morning, all the media will talk about it, and people will say, ‘Well, what difference does it make?’ ” Huelskamp added.

Other House Republicans said they are ready to accept a funding bill without the immigration riders.

“If a clean bill comes here, we have to accept a vote on it,” said Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.), who has been critical of his colleagues during previous funding showdowns.

King suggested the GOP brand would suffer if the agency were to shut down.

“People think we’re crazy. There are terrorist attacks all over the world and we’re talking about closing down Homeland Security. This is like living in a world with crazy people,” King said.

King acknowledged that view is “probably not” shared by the majority of his conference, but predicted a clean bill would pass in the House with Democratic support.