Coburn donates to Manchin, says fellow senator not beholden to special interests

Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Worries grow about political violence as midterms approach President Trump’s war on federal waste American patients face too many hurdles in regard to health-care access MORE (R-Okla.) says he supports Democratic Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinLabor head warns of 'frightening uptick' in black lung disease among miners Labor leader: Trump has stopped erosion of coal jobs Overnight Energy: States fight Trump rollback of Obama lightbulb rules | Greens seek hearing over proposed rule on energy efficiency tests | Top Dem asks GAO to investigate climate threat MORE’s re-election because he believes Manchin is not beholden to short-sighted political interests.

Coburn recently gave $250 to Manchin’s re-election campaign.

“I think he votes thinking about the long-term interests of the country. We don’t agree on everything but he’s a good guy,” Coburn told The Hill.

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A new fundraising report filed with the Federal Election Commission showed that Coburn donated to Manchin, who faces re-election in November, in late June.

Manchin, who was elected with 53 percent of the vote, is expected to soundly defeat Republican challenger John Raese.  

Coburn’s support is an indication that Manchin could sign on to a comprehensive deficit-reduction package at the end of this year or in 2013

Coburn has been at the center of bipartisan talks with Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerOvernight Defense: Congressional leaders receive classified briefing on Iran | Trump on war: 'I hope not' | Key Republican calls threats credible | Warren plan targets corporate influence at Pentagon Key Republican 'convinced' Iran threats are credible Hillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group MORE (D-Va.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinLet's stop treating student borrowers like second-class citizens Trump's immigration push faces Capitol Hill buzzsaw Hillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group MORE (D-Ill.), Kent. Conrad (D-N.D.), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoTrump, Senate GOP discuss effort to overhaul legal immigration Dems propose fining credit agencies for data breaches Mueller fails to break stalemate on election meddling crackdown MORE (R-Idaho) and Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissRepublicans say Democrats holding up disaster relief as 'Sandy payback' Ex-House Intel chair: Intel panel is wrong forum to investigate Trump's finances The Hill's Morning Report - Trump budget reignites border security fight MORE (R-Ga.) over a package to cut spending and raise taxes.

Manchin has said he wants to pass a major deficit-slashing bill at the end of the year, avoiding questions about whether he would vote to extend all of the Bush tax cuts or only those for families earning below $250,000.

“I’m totally for the Bowles-Simpson [plan] and will continue to work for Bowles-Simpson,” he told The Hill last month. “We need to revamp the system and I think Bowles-Simpson is the pragmatic way to do it.”

Manchin indicated to reporters this past week, however, that he may be warming up to the idea of voting for a Senate Democratic plan to extend the Bush tax cuts only for households earning below $250,000.

“I’m looking at all the options,” he said. “You’ve got two options: kick the can down the road further than it’s been kicked — I don’t think that’s a good option — the other one is to try to fix part of it.

“I’m getting more inclined,” he said.

Groups that have lobbied Democratic senators on the Bush tax rates say Sens. Jim Webb (D-Va.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) are the two members of the Democratic caucus likely to oppose the latest Democratic proposal on income tax rates. A lobbyist for one interest group said he is hopeful the rest of the Democratic caucus will support President Obama’s plan.

Manchin said last week he still supports using the Bowles-Simpson blueprint as a template for deficit cutting.

Manchin has declined to say whether he will vote for Obama in the general election.