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Senate fails to reach deal on trade amendments

Senate fails to reach deal on trade amendments
© Greg Nash

Rank-and-file senators are objecting to a package of trade amendments hashed out by Senate leaders in both parties.

As a result, it looks all but certain that there will not be a deal on amendments to the fast-track trade package and the Senate will only vote on five pending germane amendments.

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If Democrats are upset they’ve been shut out of the debate, they could retaliate by refusing to extend procedural courtesies on timing — which could delay a final vote on fast-track authority until early Sunday morning.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenTwo more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers On The Money: Push for student loan forgiveness puts Biden in tight spot | Trump is wild card as shutdown fears grow | Mnuchin asks Fed to return 5 billion in unspent COVID emergency funds Grassley, Wyden criticize Treasury guidance concerning PPP loans MORE (Ore.), the senior Democrat on the Finance Committee, presented a package of amendments he negotiated with Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchMellman: What happened after Ginsburg? Bottom line Bottom line MORE (R-Utah) to the Democratic caucus on Friday afternoon.

Democratic aides said Hatch and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) had participated in the talks that produced the package of 21 amendments — which includes the five pending amendments already guaranteed a vote. The 16 amendments that are not already pending would have needed 60 votes each to pass, under the terms of the deal.

Aides say Hatch and McConnell agreed to the package and pledged to circulate it among the rest of their Republican colleagues in order to secure a unanimous consent agreement to vote on it.

But Hatch and Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynCornyn spox: Neera Tanden has 'no chance' of being confirmed as Biden's OMB pick Cornyn on Biden aides' undisclosed ties: 'The Senate is not obligated to confirm anyone who hides this information' Cornyn says election outcome 'becoming increasingly clear': report MORE (Texas) told reporters after a GOP lunch meeting Friday that they were not optimistic that all senators would agree to votes.

“I tried to be accommodating to both sides,” Hatch said. “There’s always somebody who objects so we’re back to where we were.”

Hatch downplayed the likelihood of voting on a package of 21 amendments since the votes on the germane amendments are due to begin at 5 p.m. Friday.

“Let’s face it, we’re not going to debate this all over again,” he said.

Cornyn told reporters, “I don’t think there's going to be an agreed slate. We've been trying.”

It didn’t seem GOP leaders made much of an effort to sell the package to their conference.

One Republican senator said it didn’t even come up for discussion during Friday’s lunch meeting.

Senate aides said Republican and Democratic senators have already raised objections to the package.

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), who has led the Democratic opposition to the trade package, said he was satisfied with the group of amendments hashed out by Wyden and Hatch.

“I’m not going to object,” he said.  

The package includes an amendment co-sponsored by Brown and Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), dubbed the Leveling the Playing Field Act, that would allow U.S. businesses to seek redress from the Commerce Department for unfair foreign trade practices.  

Without a deal, the Senate will vote on the five pending germane amendments at 5 p.m. Friday and then vote on the adoption of the Hatch-Wyden substitute, which contains the meat of the trade package, and then vote to end debate on the underlying House shell bill.

Unless senators yield back time, 30 hours of post-cloture time would have to elapse before a final vote on fast-track — early Sunday morning at the latest.