Reid will postpone filibuster reform

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidHarry Reid: 'People should not be counting Joe Biden out of the race yet' Warren highlights work with Obama, Harry Reid in new Nevada ad Yes, Democrats have to defend their African-American base against Trump MORE (D-Nev.) will postpone filibuster reform until later this month, giving him time to negotiate a deal with Republicans, say Democratic lawmakers and aides.

A group of liberal Democrats had been pushing Reid to trigger the so-called "nuclear option" on Thursday, the first day of the 113th Congress, to make it more difficult for the minority to stall legislation and nominees.

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A senior Democratic aide said Reid will instead recess the chamber at the end of Thursday’s proceedings to extend the legislative day until later this month.

This would preserve his ability to amend the Senate’s filibuster rules on the first legislative day of the 113th Congress, even if that reform would not come until late January.

A Democratic aide said Reid is hoping to negotiate a standing order or rules change to improve the chamber’s efficiency when it resumes work, likely on Jan. 22, after President Obama’s inauguration.

“I think the conversation is going to continue between [Senate Minority Leader Mitch] McConnell [(R-Ky.)] and Harry Reid about this. I think they’re going to see if there’s a way to reach a bipartisan agreement, they’re still talking,” said Senate Democratic Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinThe Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders surge triggers Dem angst As many as eight GOP senators expected to vote to curb Trump's power to attack Iran MORE (Ill.).

“We’re going to preserve our rights, we’re going to stay in the first legislative day and deal with the rules when we get back after the inauguration,” said Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOvernight Energy: Experts criticize changes to EPA lead, copper rule | House panel looks into plan to limit powers of EPA science advisers | Senate bill aims for net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 Overnight Energy: Trump budget slashes EPA funding | International hunting council disbands amid lawsuit | Bill targets single-use plastics Bill targets single-use plastics in push to make manufacturers responsible MORE (D-N.M.), a leading proponent of reform.

Reid and McConnell will use a bipartisan proposal crafted by Sens. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinThe Trumpification of the federal courts Global health is the last bastion of bipartisan foreign policy Can the United States Senate rise to the occasion? Probably not MORE (D-Mich.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEleventh Democratic presidential debate to be held in Phoenix Moderate Democrats now in a race against the clock Biden on Graham's push for investigation: 'I don't know what happened' to him MORE (R-Ariz.) as the basis of their talks.

Levin and McCain, the chairman and ranking Republican of the Senate Armed Services Committee, respectively, have put forward a three-part reform of the filibuster rule.

Their proposal would make it easier for the majority leader to take up new business by empowering him to deny the minority the ability to filibuster motions to proceed. In exchange, the leader would have to guarantee the minority leader and a bill’s minority manager each the right to offer an amendment, even an amendment on non-germane business.

The leader would have the option of scheduling an immediate vote to end a filibuster of a motion to proceed if five additional senators from each caucus sign a cloture motion.

Additionally, the Levin-McCain plan would speed the process for bringing legislation to conference negotiations with the House. It would collapse the three motions currently needed to proceed to conference into one motion that could be voted on after two hours of debate.

Their proposal would also speed consideration of lower-level executive and judicial branch nominees. Motions to end debate on non-Cabinet-level officials and district court nominees could receive votes after two hours of debate.

Levin and McCain have proposed putting the new process in place through a standing order, which would need to be approved by three-fifths of the Senate and would sunset at the end of two years.

If Reid used the nuclear option, which proponents call the “Constitutional option,” he could change the Senate’s filibuster rules with a simple majority vote. But it’s a controversial tactic that has never been actually employed to change Senate rules. The threat of its use has motivated the minority party to broker compromises in the past.

Liberals say the Levin-McCain proposal is inadequate because it would not implement their highest-priority reform, the so-called talking filibuster.

Udall and Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleySenate Dems blast Barr for 'clear violation' of duty in Stone case, urge him to resign Senate Democrats introduce legislation to change impeachment trial rules Hillicon Valley: Facebook suspends misinformation networks targeting US | Lawmakers grill census officials on cybersecurity | Trump signs order to protect GPS | Dem senators propose federal facial recognition moratorium MORE (D-Ore), the leading advocates for filibuster reform, say lawmakers who filibuster legislation should be required to actively hold the floor and debate. This would make it more arduous for senators who want to hold up business — they would have to organize teams to hold the floor for days or even weeks on end.

Udall said he would have to be convinced to support the Levin-McCain plan because it would not implement a talking filibuster rule, which he said is “the heart of the matter”
 
He said Reid may insist on it as part of any overhaul of Senate rules.
 
“The talking filibuster is still very much on the table,” Udall said.

—This report was originally published at 4:01 p.m. and last updated at 5:56 p.m.