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Schumer: Senate group 'very close to an agreement' on immigration reform

Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerHouse conservatives take aim at Schumer-led bipartisan China bill There will be no new immigration law under Biden, unless he changes course This week: Congressional leaders to meet with Biden amid GOP reckoning MORE (D-N.Y.), a leading negotiator in talks on immigration reform, says the Senate Gang of Eight is on track for a deal by the end of March.

Schumer and other members of the gang have packed their schedules with meetings to hammer out the biggest policy disagreements before Congress leaves for a two-week recess.

“We’re very close to an agreement,” said Schumer. “We met this morning for two hours. We’re meeting again this afternoon. We expect to meet our goal of having comprehensive immigration reform supported by all eight of us by the end of March. We’re on track.”

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The other members of the group are Sens. Dick DurbinDick DurbinAmazon blocks 10B listings in crackdown on counterfeits DOJ faces big decision on home confinement America's Jewish communities are under attack — Here are 3 things Congress can do MORE (D-Ill.), Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezJuan Williams: A breakthrough on immigration? Biden rebuffs Democrats, keeps refugee admissions at 15,000 Bottom line MORE (D-N.J.), Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetManchin on collision course with Warren, Sanders Democrats vow to push for permanent child tax credit expansion Senate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap MORE (D-Colo.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEx-McSally aide pleads guilty to stealing over 0K in campaign funds DOJ: Arizona recount could violate civil rights laws Cheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women MORE (R-Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHouse conservatives take aim at Schumer-led bipartisan China bill There will be no new immigration law under Biden, unless he changes course McConnell safe in power, despite Trump's wrath MORE (R-S.C.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioDemocrats cool on Crist's latest bid for Florida governor Tim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (R-Fla.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeThe unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  Cindy McCain: Arizona election audit is 'ludicrous' The Republicans' deep dive into nativism MORE (R-Ariz.).

The group still has to resolve the question of how many H-1B visas should be allocated for high-skilled workers in technical fields such in engineering, science and medicine.

Schumer said there are concerns that foreign workers could receive training in the United States and then return to their home countries, undermining the technical advantage of U.S. industries.

“There’s broad consensus on letting more high-tech people into the country, but what we want to do is make sure that those kinds of mills that don’t really end up helping America, but rather might be mills where you get training here and go back home, can’t be allowed to continue the way they do,” he said.