Gun control debate pushes back GOP talk on immigration

Immigration reform legislation initially set to be unveiled as early as Thursday could be delayed until next week as the Senate’s Gang of Eight scrambles to finish the bill. 

Negotiators say they’re working on last-minute tweaks before unveiling the legislation, which also slipped down the Senate agenda following Wednesday’s announcement of a deal on gun violence legislation. 

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“I don’t see, looking forward the next few days, any major barrier in the way,” said Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis Schumer4 in 5 Americans say they support net neutrality: poll GOP senator: Trump's criticism of McCain 'deplorable' Schumer to introduce bill naming Senate office building after McCain amid Trump uproar MORE (D-N.Y.), who has led the immigration talks. “Either the end of this week or next week. We’re still shooting for the end of this week. We have the total draft of the bill. There are still little pieces people have to go [through]. Depends how quickly we move through those.”

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainWhat should Democrats do next, after Mueller's report? Tom Daschle: McCain was a model to be emulated, not criticized Former astronaut running for Senate in Arizona returns money from paid speech in UAE MORE (Ariz.), one of the lead Republican negotiators, said: “We’re trying but it may spill over into next week.”

“We’re out of time,” McCain said.

Negotiators characterized the remaining issues as minor and predicted they would not hold up the legislation.

GOP aides said Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioCountdown clock is on for Mueller conclusions Rubio wants 'all' of Mueller report made public including founding documents Rubio: Trump reversal on North Korea sanctions 'shouldn't have happened that way' MORE (R-Fla.) had been scheduled to brief a Wednesday meeting of Republican senators about the immigration reform bill. But that plan fell by the wayside after Sen. Pat Toomey (Pa.), a Republican with an A rating from the National Rifle Association, announced a bipartisan deal with Democrats to expand background checks for gun sales.

One Gang of Eight member said earlier this week the bipartisan group initially hoped to unveil the immigration bill on Thursday. 

But now it appears that schedule will slip.

The negotiators still have to finalize language on H-1B visas for high-skilled workers as well as provisions affecting agricultural workers, said a person familiar with the talks.

Construction companies could be the most disappointed with the legislation, which places a low cap on immigrant workers in the building industry and sets wage standards to address the concerns of unions, according to a person briefed on the discussions.

Interests advocating for an increase in STEM visas — for immigrants with advanced science, technology, engineering and math backgrounds — are likely to be pleased with the legislation. 

A person familiar with the talks said that while there are strict caps — lower than Republicans wanted — on many types of worker visas, STEM visas will not count against the quota.

Schumer and other members of the Gang of Eight have been lobbied in recent days to boost the number of STEM visas.

IBM, Microsoft and several interest groups sent a letter to members of the Senate group Tuesday urging them to make up for the shortage of U.S. workers with technical training.

“Unfortunately, our country is not producing enough workers to fulfill the ever-growing talent needs of our most innovative companies,” they wrote.

The companies cited a study predicting that between 2010 and 2020, the U.S. economy will produce more than 120,000 computing jobs requiring a bachelor’s degree, while the nation’s higher-education system will confer only 40,000 bachelor’s degrees in computer science.

When members of the Gang of Eight eyed Thursday as a possible date to roll out immigration reform legislation, the gun violence bill had appeared to be stalled. 

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLessons from the 1999 U.S. military intervention in Kosovo Five things to watch as AIPAC conference kicks off Romney helps GOP look for new path on climate change MORE (Ky.) announced Monday he would filibuster the gun legislation.

The Senate’s focus shifted Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning as word spread that Toomey and Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinRomney helps GOP look for new path on climate change Manchin says he won't support LGBTQ protection bill as written Senators offer bipartisan bill to fix 'retail glitch' in GOP tax law MORE (D-W.Va.) had reached a deal to expand background checks, the centerpiece of President Obama’s gun control agenda.

Gun regulation dominated the discussion of the Senate Republican Conference during Wednesday’s meeting after Toomey briefed his colleagues on the background checks deal, said senators who attended. Immigration reform didn’t even come up.

At a lunch meeting of the Senate Republican Steering Committee, senators “vented” about the pressure they’ve felt on their right flank from groups such as the National Association for Gun Rights and Gun Owners of America, according to a lawmaker who attended.

The National Association for Gun Rights has aired television and radio ads in Maine accusing Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' MORE (R) of trying to strip gun rights from people who seek mental health treatment. The group has also targeted Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamRomney helps GOP look for new path on climate change Dem senator: 'Appropriate' for Barr, Mueller to testify publicly about Russia probe Conservatives wage assault on Mueller report MORE (R-S.C.), Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyTreasury expands penalty relief to more taxpayers Overnight Health Care: Senators seek CBO input on preventing surprise medical bills | Oversight panel seeks OxyContin documents | Pharmacy middlemen to testify on prices | Watchdog warns air ambulances can put patients at 'financial risk' Drug prices are a matter of life and death MORE (R-Iowa) and Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonTrump keeps up attacks on 'horrible' McCain, despite calls from GOP, veterans Crenshaw to Trump: 'Stop talking about McCain' Scaramucci: Trump McCain attacks are 'socially unnatural,' 'stupid' MORE (R-Ga.) in a grassroots lobbying campaign.

This story was updated at 8:17 p.m.