GOP senator will push bill to create cybersecurity committee

GOP senator will push bill to create cybersecurity committee

Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerEleven interesting races to watch in 2022 The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden to tackle omicron risks with new travel rules Gun control group alleges campaign finance violations in lawsuit against NRA MORE (R-Colo.) will introduce a bill next Congress to create a select Senate committee to deal with cybersecurity issues.

Gardner has previously called for a special cybersecurity committee, Politico reported Monday night, but his plan to create it via legislation is new.

The plan comes one day after Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerDemocrats calls on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Predictions of disaster for Democrats aren't guarantees of midterm failure Voting rights and Senate wrongs MORE (N.Y) and Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRedistricting reform key to achieving the bipartisanship Americans claim to want Kelly takes under-the-radar approach in Arizona Senate race Voting rights, Trump's Big Lie, and Republicans' problem with minorities MORE (R-Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenators introduce bill aimed at protecting Ukrainian civilians Kyrsten Sinema's courage, Washington hypocrisy and the politics of rage Hillicon Valley: Amazon's Alabama union fight — take two MORE (R-S.C.) and Jack ReedJack ReedDefense bill sets up next fight over military justice  Ukraine president, US lawmakers huddle amid tensions with Russia Photos of the Week: Tornado aftermath, Medal of Honor and soaring superheroes MORE (D-R.I.) sent a letter calling for GOP leadership to create a new select committee on cybersecurity to investigate Russian hacking of the presidential election.

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The letter, and Gardner’s push, set up a potential conflict with Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden stiff arms progressives on the Postal Service Biden clarifies any Russian movement into Ukraine 'is an invasion' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden talks, Senate balks MORE (R-Ky.).

Last week, McConnell rejected calls for a special committee, arguing that the Senate Intelligence Committee should take the lead as a matter of “regular order.”

The debate over an investigation was sparked by a CIA assessment that reportedly found Russian hackers tried to help President-elect Donald TrumpDonald TrumpPredictions of disaster for Democrats aren't guarantees of midterm failure A review of President Biden's first year on border policy  Hannity after Jan. 6 texted McEnany 'no more stolen election talk' in five-point plan for Trump MORE win the election. They did so, intelligence analysts believe, by leaking documents that hurt Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe dangerous erosion of Democratic Party foundations The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats see victory in a voting rights defeat Left laughs off floated changes to 2024 ticket MORE’s presidential campaign while holding back information stolen from the GOP. 

Senior intelligence officials have said Russian President Vladimir Putin was personally involved in leaking sensitive hacked information during the campaign, though Trump and his top aides have disputed those conclusions.