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GOP senator will push bill to create cybersecurity committee

GOP senator will push bill to create cybersecurity committee

Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerPush to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw Democratic super PAC pulls remaining ads from Colorado Senate race Exclusive: Poll shows Affordable Care Act challenge a liability for McConnell at home MORE (R-Colo.) will introduce a bill next Congress to create a select Senate committee to deal with cybersecurity issues.

Gardner has previously called for a special cybersecurity committee, Politico reported Monday night, but his plan to create it via legislation is new.

The plan comes one day after Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerTrump to lift Sudan terror sponsor designation Ocasio-Cortez, progressives call on Senate not to confirm lobbyists or executives to future administration posts The 2016 and 2020 Senate votes are about the same thing: constitutionalist judges MORE (N.Y) and Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Trump digs in on conspiracy theory over bin Laden raid At 97, Bob Dole is still fighting for his country MORE (R-Ariz.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election Biden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE (R-S.C.) and Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedOvernight Defense: Famed Navy SEAL calls Trump out | Yemen's Houthi rebels free two Americans | Marines fire commander after deadly training accident Trump slight against Gold Star families adds to military woes Dems to focus on issues, not character, at Barrett hearings MORE (D-R.I.) sent a letter calling for GOP leadership to create a new select committee on cybersecurity to investigate Russian hacking of the presidential election.

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The letter, and Gardner’s push, set up a potential conflict with Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate GOP eyes Oct. 26 for confirming Barrett to Supreme Court GOP noncommittal about vote on potential Trump-Pelosi coronavirus deal Overnight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas MORE (R-Ky.).

Last week, McConnell rejected calls for a special committee, arguing that the Senate Intelligence Committee should take the lead as a matter of “regular order.”

The debate over an investigation was sparked by a CIA assessment that reportedly found Russian hackers tried to help President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE win the election. They did so, intelligence analysts believe, by leaking documents that hurt Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonLate night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study 10 steps toward better presidential debating Continuity is (mostly) on the menu for government contracting in the next administration MORE’s presidential campaign while holding back information stolen from the GOP. 

Senior intelligence officials have said Russian President Vladimir Putin was personally involved in leaking sensitive hacked information during the campaign, though Trump and his top aides have disputed those conclusions.