Graham: 99 percent of senators believe Russia interfered in election

Graham: 99 percent of senators believe Russia interfered in election
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Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump: Anonymous news sources are 'bulls---' Trump: 'Good chance' Dems give immigration 'win' after Pelosi called White House plan 'dead on arrival' The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition — Trump: GOP has `clear contrast' with Dems on immigration MORE (R-S.C.) says President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls for Republicans to be 'united' on abortion Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Facebook temporarily suspended conservative commentator Candace Owens MORE is at odds with nearly the entire Senate over whether Russia interfered in the election.

“There are 100 United States senators. ... I would say that 99 percent of us believe that the Russians did this, and we’re going to do something about it,” Graham told CNN’s Jim Sciutto on “The Situation Room” on Tuesday.

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Graham appeared alongside Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMSNBC host: Barr 'the most dangerous person' who works for Trump Several factors have hindered 'next up' presidential candidates in recent years Small Florida county that backed Trump one of two targeted by Russians: reports MORE (R-Ariz.) from Estonia, a Baltic nation he said knows firsthand the danger Russia represents.

“It’s just not in our backyard. [Russia’s] doing it all over the world, not just the United States. They’re interfering in elections in democratic countries’ efforts to self-determination all over the world," Graham said.

"Along with Sen. McCain, after this trip is over, we’re going to have the hearings. We’re going to put sanctions together that hit [Russian President Vladimir] Putin as an individual and his inner circle for interfering in our election.”

Graham, McCain and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharInslee gives public option first test in Washington state Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error MORE (D-Minn.) are meeting with officials across a wide array of European nations who have issues with Russia. The trio of senators will journey to Georgia, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro and Ukraine after departing Estonia.

The U.S. intelligence community publicly said during the election that Russia was behind the hacks of Democratic groups. And a CIA assessment reportedly concluded that the Kremlin was interfering specifically to help Trump win.

Both Trump and Moscow have denied Russian involvement in the election.