Manchin 'not going to filibuster’ Trump’s Supreme Court nominee

Manchin 'not going to filibuster’ Trump’s Supreme Court nominee

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinManchin says he won't support LGBTQ protection bill as written Senators offer bipartisan bill to fix 'retail glitch' in GOP tax law Murkowski, Manchin call for 'responsible solutions' to climate change MORE (W.Va.) says he isn't planning to join calls from fellow Democrats to filibuster President Trump’s forthcoming Supreme Court nominee. 

“I’m not going to filibuster anybody,” Manchin told the conservative Weekly Standard on Tuesday.

Senate Democrats are expected to put up a fight over Trump's pick to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by Antonin Scalia's death last year.

Republicans need 60 votes to prevent a filibuster, but the GOP only holds 52 seats, meaning they’ll need at least eight Democrats to override a filibuster.

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Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerGOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 Why we need to build gateway now Campaign to draft Democratic challenger to McConnell starts raising funds MORE (D-N.Y.) said earlier this month that Democrats would fight “tooth and nail” if Trump’s Supreme Court pick isn’t "bipartisan and mainstream."

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyBusiness groups urge Congress to combat LGBTQ discrimination in workplace Overnight Energy: EPA moves to raise ethanol levels in gasoline | Dems look to counter White House climate council | Zinke cleared of allegations tied to special election Will Washington finally do something about high drug prices? MORE (D-Ore.) also circulated a petition Monday urging colleagues to block any Trump nominee given Senate Republicans' refusal to give a hearing or vote to Merrick Garland, former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaWhatever happened to nuclear abolition? On The Money: Trump presses GM, union to start talks over closed plant | Trump renews call to cut arts, PBS funding | Alan Krueger, former Obama economic adviser, dies at 58 | Americans expected to bet .5B on March Madness Obama reminisces about visit to Ireland on St. Patrick's Day: 'It'll always be O'Bama' MORE's pick to fill the vacancy last year.

“This is a stolen seat. This is the first time a Senate majority has stolen a seat,” Merkley told Politico. “We will use every lever in our power to stop this. ... I will definitely object to a simple majority.”

The Senate GOP's refusal has left the country’s highest court with only eight justices for nearly a year.

But Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Rourke: Decisions on late-term abortions 'best left to a woman and her doctor' New report details O'Rourke's prankish past O'Rourke sees 'a lot of wisdom' in abolishing Electoral College MORE (R-Texas) told Politico on Tuesday that Republicans could move to amend Senate rules, changing the 60-vote threshold that the GOP would need to meet to block a filibuster.

"The Democrats are not going to succeed in filibustering the Supreme Court nominee," Cruz said. "All procedural options are on the table. The bottom line is we will confirm a strong conservative to replace Justice Scalia."

Trump is expected to announce his Supreme Court nominee Tuesday night.