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Sanders: Vote to silence Warren is an 'outrage’

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOVERNIGHT ENERGY:  EPA announces new clean air advisors after firing Trump appointees |  Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior | Watchdog: Bureau of Land Management saw messaging failures, understaffing during pandemic Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Democratic senators press PhRMA over COVID-19 lobbying efforts  MORE (I-Vt.) is joining chorus of Democratic support for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Democratic senators press PhRMA over COVID-19 lobbying efforts  Schumer vows to only pass infrastructure package that is 'a strong, bold climate bill' MORE (D-Mass.) after Republicans blocked her from speaking on the Senate floor.
 
"When Senator Warren read her statement, she was told that she could no longer participate  in this debate over Senator Sessions's nomination, which I regard as an outrage," Sanders said from the Senate floor Wednesday. 
 
 
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He added that it was "incomprehensible" that Warren was rebuked for reading a letter from Coretta Scott King, Martin Luther King Jr.’s widow, criticizing Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Border state governors rebel against Biden's immigration chaos Garland strikes down Trump-era asylum decisions MORE (R-Ala.), who is President Trump’s nominee for attorney general.
 
"We need to hear all points of view," he added. "The idea that ... a letter that she wrote could not be presented and spoken about here on the Senate floor is to me incomprehensible."
 
Coretta Scott King wrote in 1986, during Sessions's failed confirmation hearing for a federal judgeship, that he “had used the awesome power of his office to chill the free exercise of the vote by black citizens" as a U.S. attorney in Alabama. 
 
McConnell specifically pointed to Warren quoting the letter as evidence that she had broken the rules barring senators from questioning "the conduct or motive" of other senators. 
 
Sanders linked the Senate GOP move to the Trump administration, accusing them of pushing back against individuals publicly who disagree with them.
 
"It comes at a time when we have a president who refers to a judge who issues a ruling in opposition to the president as a 'so-called judge,' which tells every judge in America that they will be insulted and marginalized by this president if they dare to disagree with him," he said.