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Schumer: House repeal bill is 'Trumpcare'

Schumer: House repeal bill is 'Trumpcare'
© Greg Nash

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSunday shows preview: Trump taps acting attorney general to lead Justice Department Pro-Israel organizations should finally seek payback against Iran deal Dems Pelosi: Acting attorney general 'should not be there' MORE (D-N.Y.) is taking a page from the GOP's playbook, labeling a contentious House bill to nix the Affordable Care Act as "Trumpcare."

"Trumpcare will make health insurance in America measurably worse in just about every way and likely leave more Americans uninsured," he said.

Republicans quickly labeled former President Obama's 2009 healthcare bill as "ObamaCare," part of their strategy to link Democrats and the president to the legislation.

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House Republicans rolled out their proposal to repeal ObamaCare Monday night, earning opposition from Democrats and, increasingly, conservative Republicans opposed to tax credits included in the plan.

Schumer argued that "Trumpcare" will increase the cost of insurance, lower taxes on the wealthy and negatively impact women's health by cutting off federal funding for Planned Parenthood. 

"With respect to women, Trumpcare would send us back to the Dark Ages," Schumer added. "The bill is a winning lottery ticket for wealthy Americans – it removes an investment tax and a surcharge on the wealthiest Americans." 

The House proposal dismantles the core provisions of ­ObamaCare, including its subsidies to help people buy coverage, expansion of Medicaid, taxes and mandates for people to have insurance. It would also cut off Planned Parenthood's taxpayer funding.  

House lawmakers are hoping to clear the bill through committee this week, a timeline that Schumer signaled was too fast.

"After years of howling at the moon about Democrats rushing through the Affordable Care Act ... Republicans are having committee votes two days after the bill is released," he added. 

The Senate is eyeing voting on the repeal bill by early April, though top GOP lawmakers haven't ruled out needing to amend the House legislation.

GOP leadership will need 51 votes to clear it through the upper chamber. No Democrats are expected to vote for repeal.