Sanders calls on Trump to come to Congress over Syria strikes

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHarris readies a Phase 2 as she seeks to rejuvenate campaign 2020 Dems put spotlight on disabilities issues Lee, Sanders introduce bill to tax Wall Street transactions MORE (I-Vt.) on Sunday said President Trump did not have the authority to launch missile strikes on the Syrian regime and called on the president to seek approval from Congress before any other actions.

“I think he has got to come to the United States Congress. I think he has got to explain to us what his long-term goals are,” Sanders told NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

Trump last week ordered the U.S. military to conduct missile strikes on a Syrian airfield believed to be the launching point of a chemical weapons attack that killed at least 70 civilians. The United States has placed blame for the attack on Syrian President Bashar Assad.

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Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have since called on Trump to seek congressional approval before future military action.

“Our goal long-term has got to work with countries around the world. We cannot do it unilaterally,” Sanders said on Sunday. 

“We’ve got to work with countries around the world for a political solution to get rid of this guy to finally bring peace and stability to this country that has been so decimated,” he said, referring to Assad.

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Iran worries dominate foreign policy talk | Pentagon reportedly to send WH plans for 10K troops in Mideast | Democrats warn Trump may push through Saudi arms sale | Lawmakers blast new Pentagon policy on sharing info Iraq War looms over Trump battle with Iran Senate passes bill to undo tax increase on Gold Star military families MORE (D-Va.), who in 2013 voted for limited strikes on the Assad regime after a chemical attack at the time, also called on Trump to seek approval from Congress during a Sunday appearance on NBC. 

“We are a nation where you’re not supposed to initiate military action, start war, without a plan that’s presented to and approved by congress,” Kaine told “Meet the Press.”