Warren: McConnell won't say hello to me

Warren: McConnell won't say hello to me
© Greg Nash

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Warren, Pressley introduce bill to make it a crime for police officers to deny medical care to people in custody MORE (D-Mass.) said in a recent interview that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Energy: US Park Police say 'tear gas' statements were 'mistake' | Trump to reopen area off New England coast for fishing | Vulnerable Republicans embrace green issues The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump juggles three crises ahead of November election Vulnerable Republicans embrace green issues in battle to save seats MORE (R-Ky.) brushes her off when she says hello.

In an interview with The Boston Globe about the release of her latest book, “This Fight Is Our Fight,” Warren said McConnell turns his head when she says hello. 

“I’ve spoken to him, but he has not spoken to me,” Warren told the newspaper. “I say hello to Mitch every chance I get, and he turns his head.”

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Warren’s book, which comes out April 18, reportedly ends before the infamous February incident when Republicans voted to bar her from speaking on the Senate floor following her blistering comments on former Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMcCabe, Rosenstein spar over Russia probe Rosenstein takes fire from Republicans in heated testimony Rosenstein defends Mueller appointment, role on surveillance warrants MORE (R-Ala.), then the nominee for attorney general.

McConnell defended the move at the time, saying Warren had been warned and saying that she "impugned the motives and conduct of our colleague from Alabama," referring to Sessions.

"Sen. Warren was giving a lengthy speech. She had appeared to violate the rule. She was warned. She was given an explanation," he said. "Nevertheless, she persisted."

Warren seized the spotlight after the incident, which followed weeks of culminating tension over President Trump's Cabinet nominees. 

Warren's book, according to the Globe, ends with the women’s marches that took place following Trump’s inauguration in January.