Cruz: No surrender

Cruz: No surrender
© Greg Nash

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate MORE (R-Texas) is defiant. [WATCH VIDEO]

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The Texas Republican refuses to back off the idea of using another showdown over government funding to delay ObamaCare, even as Republican leaders are ready to move on.

Cruz’s insistence comes in the face of deep criticism from fellow Senate Republicans.

“I would do anything and I will continue to do anything I can to stop the train wreck that is ObamaCare,” Cruz told ABC News when asked whether he would push the country to the brink of another shutdown.

“I don’t work for the party bosses in Washington,” he added on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday.

His recent bruising battles with the GOP leadership have had one clear positive for the freshman Republican. He has cemented his role as the Tea Party’s standard-bearer.

“Ted Cruz had a very good last few weeks for himself because his whole goal is to build a national brand with the Tea Party segment of the Republican electorate and he certainly did that,” said John Ullyot, a Republican strategist and longtime Senate aide.

In a matter of weeks, Cruz has positioned himself as a formidable potential candidate for president in 2016, eclipsing Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Trump takes flak for not joining anti-extremism pact | Phone carriers largely end sharing of location data | Huawei pushes back on ban | Florida lawmakers demand to learn counties hacked by Russians | Feds bust 0M cybercrime group Huawei says inclusion on US trade blacklist is in 'no one's interest' Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran MORE (R-Fla.), who was considered the Senate’s brightest conservative star at the start of the year.

Reporters on Capitol Hill often mob Cruz, who has served less than a year in the Senate. Television bookers want him on their shows. He has a huge megaphone, and that is a problem for GOP leaders in Congress.

Cruz also has an army of followers. Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.), a vocal critic of the 42-year-old senator, gets many calls from Cruz allies. Some of the comments have been “vile,” King said recently.

Ullyot said Cruz’s goal is to emerge as the leading conservative alternative to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie or former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

“Rubio’s big problem is he needed to become the candidate of the more conservative wing of the party and Ted Cruz has supplanted Rubio,” the strategist said.

But even as Cruz has amplified his influence with the conservative base, some Republican strategists warn he could end up destroying his party’s ability to win national elections.

“If it came down to Ted Cruz and Chris Christie, I bet you three quarters of the Republican Party would be supporting Chris Christie,” said Ford O’Connell, a Republican strategist who worked for the McCain-Palin ticket in 2008.

“He probably hurt himself in terms of 2016 electability,” O’Connell added.

There is no mistaking the extent to which Cruz divides opinion, even within his party.

Former Fla. Gov. Jeb Bush (R) said in an interview that aired on ABC’s “This Week” Sunday that Cruz ought to “have a little bit of self-restraint.”

He has become increasingly isolated in the Republican conference. When GOP colleagues excoriated Cruz at a private Oct. 9 meeting, no one in the room stood up to defend him, according to a source.

Another source with knowledge of the meeting said the group of angry Republican senators also lambasted Cruz’s ally, Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeFrustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran Congress can expand paid leave and help workers save with bipartisan support Export-Import Bank back to full strength after Senate confirmations MORE (R-Utah). When Cruz walked in 20 minutes late, they focused their fire on the Texas freshman.

Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteSinema, Gallagher fastest lawmakers in charity race New Hampshire senator to ask 2020 Dems to back repeal of state residency law Schultz recruiting GOP insiders ahead of possible 2020 bid MORE (N.H.), Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsHillicon Valley: Facebook co-founder calls for breaking up company | Facebook pushes back | Experts study 2020 candidates to offset 'deepfake' threat | FCC votes to block China Mobile | Groups, lawmakers accuse Amazon of violating children's privacy Experts are studying mannerisms of 2020 candidates to help offset threat of 'deepfake' videos Bolton held unexpected meeting on Iran with top intel, military advisers at CIA: report MORE (Ind.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonBarr throws curveball into Senate GOP 'spying' probe Bipartisan group of senators introduce legislation designed to strengthen cybersecurity of voting systems Trump Jr. subpoena spotlights GOP split over Russia probes MORE (Wis.) and other Republicans ripped Cruz in a private meeting for giving political ammunition to future conservative primary challengers.

Several senators believe Cruz’s strategy was motivated by one thing: his presidential ambitions.

Sen. Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.) told The Hill last month that blocking a government stopgap spending measure to demand the defunding of ObamaCare was good for White House aspirations, but not a realistic plan.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidLobbying World Mitch McConnell is not invincible Seven big decisions facing Biden in 2020 primary MORE (D-Nev.) told Univision in an interview that aired Sunday: “In an effort to help him run for president, he has done some stuff that’s really damaging to our country.”

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Treasury rejects Dem subpoena for Trump tax returns | Companies warn trade war about to hit consumers | Congress, White House to launch budget talks next week | Trump gets deal to lift steel tariffs on Mexico, Canada Schumer calls on McConnell to hold vote on Equality Act House Dem cites transgender grandson in voting for Equality Act MORE (Ky.) viewed the shutdown as a debacle for his party. In an interview with The Hill, he compared it to getting kicked by a mule and vowed to steer the party in another direction.

McConnell said the GOP’s objective should be “to fight again on another day for things we believe are important, which is keeping taxes low and continuing to try to reduce spending.”

Tea Party conservatives are already criticizing this strategy, arguing that ObamaCare is a bigger drag on the economy, and thus a better target, than Medicare and Social Security, which remain popular.

“Some people are saying, ‘Let’s pivot to entitlement cuts. Strategically, we can’t win ObamaCare.’ But stopping ObamaCare is pro-growth and people oppose the law by 2-to-1. How is it strategically smart to pivot to entitlement cuts, which doesn’t help with jobs and polls terribly?” said one Senate GOP aide.

These conflicting views set up another clash between McConnell and Cruz over tactics.

Cruz views the recent fight over the shutdown as only the first battle in a longer war.

He thinks his hard-nosed strategy can achieve future policy goals aside from defunding the Affordable Care Act.

“This was going to be a multi-stage extended battle,” he told Fox News host Sean Hannity. “But we’ve also seen a model that I think is the model going forward to defeat ObamaCare, to bring back jobs [and] economic growth, to abolish the IRS, to rein in out of control spending.”

Shortly before the Senate voted Wednesday to fund the government and raise the debt limit, Cruz took to the floor to blame his GOP colleagues for undermining the effort to repeal at least part of ObamaCare.

He made the same assertion in blunter language on Fox News.

“The House Republicans marched into battle. They exercised tremendous leadership, tremendous courage,” he said. “It should have been the Senate Republicans riding like the cavalry to support them.

“Instead, unfortunately, the Senate Republicans were divided and became basically an air force dive-bombing the House Republicans and conservatives, and once that happened there was no way to hold the line,” he added.

Cruz and his aides have given no real indication that he will change his tactics in the near future.

“It’s premature to declare any tactic in or out. Next steps will be thought through, what the leverage points are and how they can be used successfully. But the focus remains mitigating the harm ObamaCare is doing to the economy and working people,” said Sean Rushton, Cruz’s spokesman.

It is, however, an open question whether Cruz can command the same following from House Republican conservatives.

Without Tea Party allies in the House putting pressure on Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLiz Cheney faces a big decision on her future NBC's Kelly O'Donnell tears up over video celebrating 25 years at network Boehner: 'I wouldn't bother' with primary challenge to Trump if I were Kasich MORE (R-Ohio), Cruz would have much less leverage.

“How many members of Congress are going to get positive feedback from all of this?” said Ron Bonjean, a former Senate and House Republican leadership aide. “The key here is what House Republicans are going to hear back home and whether or not they would stand by Cruz once again after going through a failed strategy that was offered by him.”

Beyond Capitol Hill, the rhetoric directed against Cruz has turned white-hot at times.

The U.S. Capitol Police told The Hill on Friday that it is investigating several threats a self-identified military veteran made against Cruz on Twitter.