Senate GOP invites female senator to healthcare group after criticism

Senate GOP invites female senator to healthcare group after criticism
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Senate Republican leaders invited Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoCongress must finish work on popular conservation bill before time runs out Second GOP senator to quarantine after exposure to coronavirus GOP senator to quarantine after coronavirus exposure MORE (R-W.Va.) Tuesday to participate in a meeting of a special working group on healthcare reform after being criticized for not initially including a woman in the 13-member group.

It's not clear whether Capito will join the group permanently.

Capito told reporters she had been invited to Tuesday’s session but wasn’t certain whether she would be a full-time member.

“I don’t know,” she said, when asked about her status going forward.

“We’re going to be talking about Medicaid; that’s the issue I’m concerned about,” Capito, whose state accepted ObamaCare's Medicaid expansion, added.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP senators confident Trump pick to be confirmed by November Trump's Teflon problem: Nothing sticks, including the 'wins' Senate Republican says lawmakers can't 'boil down' what a Court nominee would do in one case like Roe v. Wade MORE (R-Ky.) has put the group together to forge legislation to repeal and replace parts of ObamaCare.

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It includes members of his leadership team such as Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynSupreme Court fight pushes Senate toward brink Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close Lawmakers introduce legislation to boost cybersecurity of local governments, small businesses MORE (R-Texas) and Senate Republican Conference Chairman John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSupreme Court fight pushes Senate toward brink House to vote on resolution affirming peaceful transition of power Trump dumbfounds GOP with latest unforced error MORE (R-S.D.); key committee chairmen, such as Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchBottom line Bottom line Senate GOP divided over whether they'd fill Supreme Court vacancy  MORE (R-Utah); and influential conservatives and moderates such as Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate GOP set to vote on Trump's Supreme Court pick before election Supreme Court fight pushes Senate toward brink Crenshaw looms large as Democrats look to flip Texas House seat MORE (R-Texas) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanMcConnell locks down key GOP votes in Supreme Court fight Romney undecided on authorizing subpoenas for GOP Obama-era probes Congress needs to prioritize government digital service delivery MORE (R-Ohio).

The group, however, did not initially include a woman, stirring controversy in the media and criticism from Democrats because the House healthcare bill passed last week includes a number of provisions affecting women’s health, such as language defunding Planned Parenthood for a year.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTrump's Teflon problem: Nothing sticks, including the 'wins' Durbin: Democrats can 'slow' Supreme Court confirmation 'perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at most' Senate GOP set to vote on Trump's Supreme Court pick before election MORE (R-Maine), who has voiced concerns about efforts to defund Planned Parenthood and has sponsored an alternative bill to repeal ObamaCare in states that opt to, says she will continue to work on healthcare issues separately from the group.