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Senate GOP invites female senator to healthcare group after criticism

Senate GOP invites female senator to healthcare group after criticism
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Senate Republican leaders invited Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Dem path to a Senate majority narrows GOP shrugs off dire study warning of global warming Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Senators face Wednesday vote on Trump health plans rule | Trump officials plan downtime for ObamaCare website | Lawmakers push for action on reducing maternal deaths MORE (R-W.Va.) Tuesday to participate in a meeting of a special working group on healthcare reform after being criticized for not initially including a woman in the 13-member group.

It's not clear whether Capito will join the group permanently.

Capito told reporters she had been invited to Tuesday’s session but wasn’t certain whether she would be a full-time member.

“I don’t know,” she said, when asked about her status going forward.

“We’re going to be talking about Medicaid; that’s the issue I’m concerned about,” Capito, whose state accepted ObamaCare's Medicaid expansion, added.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Trump says GOP will support pre-existing condition protections | McConnell defends ObamaCare lawsuit | Dems raise new questions for HHS on child separations Poll finds Dems prioritize health care, GOP picks lower taxes when it's time to vote The Hill's 12:30 Report — Mnuchin won't attend Saudi conference | Pompeo advises giving Saudis 'few more days' to investigate | Trump threatens military action over caravan MORE (R-Ky.) has put the group together to forge legislation to repeal and replace parts of ObamaCare.

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It includes members of his leadership team such as Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke debate showdown Live coverage: Cruz faces O'Rourke in Texas debate showdown Trump, Feinstein feud intensifies over appeals court nominees MORE (R-Texas) and Senate Republican Conference Chairman John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneThrough a national commitment to youth sports, we can break the obesity cycle Florida politics play into disaster relief debate GOP chairman: FEMA has enough money for Hurricane Michael MORE (R-S.D.); key committee chairmen, such as Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchGOP leaders hesitant to challenge Trump on Saudi Arabia Congress should work with Trump and not 'cowboy' on Saudi Arabia, says GOP senator US to open trade talks with Japan, EU, UK MORE (R-Utah); and influential conservatives and moderates such as Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzO'Rourke gives 'a definitive no' to possibility of running in 2020 Vicente Fox endorses Beto O'Rourke in Texas Senate race Beto O'Rourke on impeachment: 'There is enough there to proceed' MORE (R-Texas) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanElection Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms How Kavanaugh got the votes  Collins to support Kavanaugh, securing enough votes for confirmation MORE (R-Ohio).

The group, however, did not initially include a woman, stirring controversy in the media and criticism from Democrats because the House healthcare bill passed last week includes a number of provisions affecting women’s health, such as language defunding Planned Parenthood for a year.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns Susan Collins and the mob mentality Graham: I hope Dems 'get their ass kicked' for conduct around Kavanaugh MORE (R-Maine), who has voiced concerns about efforts to defund Planned Parenthood and has sponsored an alternative bill to repeal ObamaCare in states that opt to, says she will continue to work on healthcare issues separately from the group.