Dems threaten to bring Senate to a crawl over FBI firing

Dems threaten to bring Senate to a crawl over FBI firing
© Greg Nash
Democrats are threatening to slow the Senate to a crawl in response to President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey.
 
 
Democrats fired a warning shot Wednesday.
 
 
"Because of the decision last night by the president of the United States to terminate the director of the FBI and the questions that its raised we gathered together, the Democratic senators on the floor, and listened as our leader at least suggested a path for us to follow as an institution facing this constitutional question," Durbin said from the Senate floor.
 
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFord's lawyer: Hearing doesn't appear to be designed for 'fair', 'respectful' treatment GOP opens door to holding Kavanaugh committee vote this week Press: Judge Kavanaugh must withdraw MORE (R-Ky.), in an unusual move, stressed during his request that committees are "doing important work" including a hearing on North Korea. 
 
The Democrats' move also abruptly ended a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that had already started. 
 
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Schumer also demanded that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein not be the one to appoint a special prosecutor for an investigation into Russia's meddling in the election, should one be named, and that Comey needs to meet with the Senate.
 
Members of the Senate Intelligence Committee announced that Comey had been invited to testify in a closed session on Tuesday, meaning it is not public.
 
 
Spokesmen for Durbin and Schumer did not respond to requests for comment on whether Democrats would try similar tactics this week to slow Senate proceedings. Murphy said there wasn't "consensus" yet on playing procedural hardball.
 
"I think this is 12 hours old, and I think we have to give a little bit of time for Republicans to have their own conversations and perhaps rise to the occasion," he said.
 
Wednesday isn't the first time Democrats have tried to leverage the Senate schedule.
 
Former Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidKavanaugh furor intensifies as calls for new testimony grow Dems can’t ‘Bork’ Kavanaugh, and have only themselves to blame Dem senator: Confidential documents would 'strongly bolster' argument against Kavanaugh's nomination MORE (D-Nev.) warned last year that he would block committee meetings as part of a protest after Republicans refused to hold hearings or votes on Merrick Garland, former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaJudge denies bid to move lawsuit over Trump national monument rollbacks to Utah Tomi Lahren to former first lady: 'Sit down, Michelle' The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump questions Kavanaugh accuser's account | Accuser may testify Thursday | Midterm blame game begins MORE's Supreme Court nominee. Democrats quickly backed down from that threat. 
 
Republicans used the procedural tactic when they were in the minority to try stall Obama's nominees. 
 
Senate committees can still meet, but under the Senate's "two-hour rule,” they are limited to meeting during the first two hours after the Senate convenes.
 
A Senate Judiciary Committee hearing ended abruptly Wednesday after word spread that Senate Democrats were planning a slowdown of committee business.
 
 
 
"At a minimum, the decision to fire Comey raises questions about the appropriateness and timing of firing the person in charge of an investigation that could — I won’t say would, but could — implicate the administration. To have this happen, and happen now, is beyond surprising," she said during the hearing. 
 
A visibly annoyed Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsRosenstein faces Trump showdown Kavanaugh: I'm asking for a 'fair process' Collins: Second Kavanaugh accuser should speak with Senate panel under oath  MORE (R-Maine) said she didn’t understand the point of the Democratic tactics, which postponed her hearing scheduled for Wednesday.
 
"Prohibiting me from chairing a hearing of the Aging Committee in which we have witnesses who have flown here from four different states, how does that contribute to solving anything that has to do with Jim Comey's firing?" she told reporters.
 
 
"We ought to want the United States Senate to function," he said from the Senate floor. "Everything does not have to be partisan. Everything does not have to be political."

Nathaniel Weixel contributed.

Updated at 4:29 p.m.