McConnell promises women can take part in healthcare meetings

McConnell promises women can take part in healthcare meetings
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTeachers union launches 0K ad buy calling for education funding in relief bill No signs of breakthrough for stalemated coronavirus talks State aid emerges as major hurdle to reviving COVID-19 talks MORE (R-Ky.) has provided assurance to GOP colleagues that women will be invited to attend future meetings of a special working group tasked with negotiating healthcare reform.

The assurances made in private, backed up by a public statement earlier in the week, have quelled concern in the GOP conference that the rollout of the working group would be derailed by controversy over gender politics.

McConnell invited three female Republican senators to attend a Tuesday meeting of the working group, which Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoAnalysis finds record high number of woman versus woman congressional races Former VA staffer charged with giving seven patients fatal insulin doses Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick MORE (R-W.Va.), a lawmaker concerned about Medicaid cuts, attended.

ADVERTISEMENT

A Thursday working group meeting was attended by Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa), who is worried about Iowa’s last major ObamaCare insurer threatening to pull out of the state market.

“The leader has assured us that at least one of the women will attend all of the meetings going forward,” said one GOP lawmaker.

Several Senate Republican sources say that McConnell told colleagues at a lunch meeting this week that any senator who wants to attend the working group’s sessions are welcome to come.

“He basically told the lunch that everyone in the caucus was invited,” said one member of the working group. “He told the lunch that everyone in the caucus, including the women, can come.” 

Another GOP senator, who requested anonymity to avoid the appearance of second-guessing leadership, said female colleagues “need to be” included in future meetings.

McConnell told reporters Tuesday that no one in his conference would be left out.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Nobody’s being excluded based upon gender,” he said after Democrats criticized him for not initially including any women in the 13-member healthcare working group. 

GOP senators on Thursday said every effort will be made to include women going forward but cautioned that their participation would be left up to them.

There are five women in the Senate Republican Conference — Capito, Ernst, Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsState aid emerges as major hurdle to reviving COVID-19 talks Senators ask for removal of tariffs on EU food, wine, spirits: report Coronavirus deal key to Republicans protecting Senate majority MORE (R-Maine), Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerCongress botched the CFPB's leadership — here's how to fix it White House, Senate GOP clash over testing funds Prioritizing access to care: Keeping telehealth options for all Americans MORE (R-Neb.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn The Money: Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire | Jobs report poised to light fire under COVID-19 talks | Tax preparers warn unemployment recipients could owe IRS Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire Hillicon Valley: Facebook removes Trump post | TikTok gets competitor | Lawmakers raise grid safety concerns MORE (R-Alaska) — so it could be tough to guarantee gender diversity at every meeting, GOP sources cautioned. 

“I don’t know that we can all guarantee that. We all have schedules that change,” said Ernst, who explained she arrived a bit late to Thursday’s meeting because she had “other obligations.”

Fischer said she hopes to attend as well, but it “depends on what the topic is going to be specifically within healthcare.”

Democrats have attacked the House-passed American Health Care Act as cutting benefits disproportionately for women. They note that the so-called essential health benefits mandated by ObamaCare include women’s health services and that more women than men are on Medicaid, the healthcare program for the poor that was expanded by the law.

Republicans hope the clarification about who can attend the meetings will put an end to the criticism they’ve received from Democrats and the media over membership in the working group.

“To not have women in the smaller group that we know is making many of the real decisions is a very, very bad thing. They are more than half the population,” Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerTo save the Postal Service, bring it online White House officials, Democrats spar over legality, substance of executive orders Schumer declines to say whether Trump executive orders are legal: They don't 'do the job' MORE (N.Y.) told reporters earlier in the week.

Schumer delivered his remarks moments after McConnell was grilled by two female reporters at the Tuesday stakeout for not formally naming any women to the working group.

Growing exasperated, McConnell told the throng of journalists, “You know, you need to write about what’s actually happening, and we’re having a discussion about the real issues. Everybody’s at the table.”

But when pressed further, he did not explicitly promise that women would participate in future meetings of the group.

“There is no particular working group because we’re meeting every day,” he said. “The group that counts, all 52 of us, have lunch every day, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.” 

One Senate GOP aide said that women in the Republican conference don’t want to be included in meetings just because they are women and generally resent the implication that they’re needed to fill some sort of quota. 

But another GOP aide quipped that it was another example of their party bungling a rollout this year, acknowledging that not formally including a woman was a “bad optic.”

Democratic women in the Senate slammed their Republican colleagues as being tone deaf.

Sen. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowACLU calls on Congress to approve COVID-19 testing for immigrants Senators press IRS chief on stimulus check pitfalls Democrats warn Biden against releasing SCOTUS list MORE (Mich.), a member of the Democratic leadership team, said “one of the biggest targets for Republicans has been eliminating preventative care for women and maternity care and so having no woman there is stunning.” 

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani says DC policymakers need to do more to support ventures and 'solo-preneurs'; Federal unemployment benefits expire as coronavirus deal-making deadlocks Overnight Defense: Pompeo pressed on move to pull troops from Germany | Panel abruptly scraps confirmation hearing | Trump meets family of slain soldier Shaheen, Chabot call for action on new round of PPP loans MORE (N.H.) called it a “huge oversight and very disappointing given how much of the healthcare legislation affects women.”

“Women are very often the people in the family who deal with healthcare issues for the rest of the family,” she added. 

“It’s just a mistake; they should bring them in,” said Sen. Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - At loggerheads, Congress, White House to let jobless payout lapse Overnight Defense: Senate poised to pass defense bill with requirement to change Confederate base names | Key senator backs Germany drawdown | Space Force chooses 'semper supra' as motto Democrats call for expedited hearing for Trump's public lands nominee MORE (D-Mont.), who faces reelection next year in a state President Trump won by double digits.