Russia sanctions deal clears key Senate hurdle

Russia sanctions deal clears key Senate hurdle
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The Senate easily voted Wednesday to advance a bipartisan agreement to slap new financial penalties on Russia and let Congress weigh in before President Trump can lift sanctions. 

Senators voted 97-2 to attach the deal to an Iran sanctions bill currently being debated on the Senate floor. Republican Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate approves 4B spending bill Some employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says Dems inflated Puerto Rico death toll | House cancels Friday votes | Florence starts to hit coast MORE (Ky.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate approves 4B spending bill Overnight Health Care: Opioid legislation passes overwhelmingly | DOJ backs Cigna-Express Scripts merger | Senate passes ban on pharmacy gag clauses US military intervention in Venezuela would be a major mistake MORE (Utah) were the only senators to vote against including new Russia penalties in the legislation.

The Senate is expected to pass the Iran and Russia sanctions bill as soon as this week. Absent an agreement, the Senate will take another procedural vote on the legislation on Thursday morning. 

The vote comes after top Republicans held off for months from backing tougher financial penalties in a bid to give the Trump administration space to try to improve the U.S.-Russia relationship, which soured under the Obama administration. 

But top senators have signaled that talks with Russia over Syria, where Moscow supports Syrian President Bashar Assad, were moving too slowly to warrant holding off on new penalties. 

"We must take our own side in this fight. Not as Republicans, not as Democrats, but as Americans. It's time to respond to Russia's attack on American democracy with strength, with resolve, with common purpose, and with action," Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump administration weakens methane pollution standards for drilling on public lands Another recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief R-E-S-P-E-C-T: One legacy of Franklin and McCain is up to us MORE (R-Ariz.) said ahead of Wednesday's vote. 

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The vote comes amid multiple investigations into Russia's interference in the U.S. presidential election and questions about the Trump campaign's possible ties to Moscow. 

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoHillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law Trump authorizes sanctions against foreign governments that interfere in US elections Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke MORE (R-Idaho), the chairman of the Banking Committee, praised the agreement as a "strong bipartisan measure" that will "result in some very powerful and new sanctions" against Russia.  

The Russia deal would impose new sanctions, including on any individuals tied to "malicious cyber activity," supplying weapons to Assad's government or individuals tied to Russia's intelligence and defense sectors. 

It would also give Congress 30 days — or 60 days around the August recess — to review and potentially block Trump from lifting or relaxing Russia sanctions; codify the sanctions on Russia imposed by executive order by the Obama administration, and allow the Trump administration to impose new sanctions on sectors of the Russian economy.

Senators in both parties pointed to the agreement, and the broader Iran bill, as an example of bipartisanship in a Senate that has been locked in partisan fights for most of the year.  

"I think it sets a good example of how the Senate can still work together to tackle complex and difficult issues," Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerGrassley: No reason to delay Kavanaugh hearing The Memo: Kavanaugh firestorm consumes political world Murkowski echoes calls for Kavanaugh, accuser to testify MORE (R-Tenn.), the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, said ahead of the vote. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerHouse Dems push to delay Kavanaugh vote for investigation Democrats should end their hypocrisy when it comes to Kavanaugh and the judiciary Celebrities back both Cuomo and Nixon as New Yorkers head to primary vote MORE (D-N.Y.) also urged support for the deal ahead of the vote, arguing it's as "bipartisan as it gets." 

"Leader [Mitch] McConnell [R-Ky.] and I worked extremely well together on this issue," he said.  

The votes comes after a swath of lawmakers — including Schumer, McConnell, Crapo, McCain, top members on the Senate Banking and Foreign Relations committees and Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' Graham knocks South Korea over summit with North MORE (R-S.C.) and Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report Dems seek ways to block Trump support for Saudi-led coalition in Yemen Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law MORE (D-N.H.) — were locked in negotiations for roughly a week trying to hash out an agreement. 

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee had been expected to mark up Russia legislation this month, but Corker and ranking member Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinOvernight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment More Dems come out in public opposition to Kavanaugh MORE (D-Md.) pointed to the Iran bill as a faster way to get Russia sanctions through the upper chamber. 

The Trump administration's warmer tone toward Moscow has sparked bipartisan backlash on Capitol Hill, where lawmakers are largely skeptical of Russian President Vladimir Putin. 

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownOvernight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment New polling shows Brown, DeWine with leads in Ohio MORE (D-Ohio), who was involved in the negotiations, said the amendment would send a message to an administration that "has been all over the diplomatic map."  

Gary Cohn, director of the White House National Economic Council, said last month that the administration wouldn't weaken Russia sanctions, adding that, "If anything, we could probably look to get tougher." 

Cohn's comments were a clarification of earlier remarks in which he said the president didn't have a position on Russia sanctions. 

The administration has also sparked concern over reports that it could hand back two diplomatic compounds in the United States to Russia. 

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned on Wednesday that Congress should not pass any legislation that would undercut "constructive dialogue" with Russia. 

"I would urge Congress to ensure any legislation allows the president to have the flexibility to adjust sanctions," he said during a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing.

Asked about Tillerson's comments, Corker told The Hill that he thought the legislation didn't prevent the administration from lifting sanctions if they are able to make progress with Russia. 

"Obviously this is a very strong piece of legislation and it is forward in its policy, but yes, if progress is made they have the ability to do what they need to do. In certain cases it would require congressional review," he said. 

He added that if he was in Tillerson's position "I would be saying the same thing. ...No administration wants input from legislative branches." 

— This report was updated at 4:06 p.m.