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Feinstein downplays talk of Kamala Harris White House bid: ‘She just got here’

Feinstein downplays talk of Kamala Harris White House bid: ‘She just got here’
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Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinIf you want Julie Su at the DOL, don't point to her resume Senate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap Lawmakers react to guilty verdict in Chauvin murder trial: 'Our work is far from done' MORE (D-Calif.) is downplaying speculation that Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) could mount a 2020 White House run, saying her junior colleage "just got here."

Feinstein told The New York Times in an article about Harris's rise in the Democratic Party that her fellow California senator is “on the way to becoming a good friend of hers.”

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“What she should do is concentrate on being a good, and possibly great, United States senator,” the senate veteran continued.

“The rest will either happen or not happen,” Feinstein said.

The article comes after CNN reported Harris raised over $600,000 during the first half of 2017 for Senate Democrats facing reelection in 2018. 

Harris was elected to the Senate last November, after being endorsed by then-President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaYoung, diverse voters fueled Biden victory over Trump Biden's relationship with top House Republican is frosty The Memo: The Obamas unbound, on race MORE.

Harris, who served as California’s attorney general, made history when she became the first Indian-American to serve in the Senate and the second black woman elected to the upper chamber.

She garnered national attention during a televised Senate Intelligence Committee hearing investigating alleged ties between the President Trump's 2016 campaign and Russian meddling in the election.

Harris was interrupted twice during these hearings by Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEx-McSally aide pleads guilty to stealing over 0K in campaign funds DOJ: Arizona recount could violate civil rights laws Cheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women MORE (R-Ariz.) and Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrUtah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote Battle lines drawn over Biden's support for vaccine waivers FDA unveils plan to ban menthol cigarettes, flavored cigars MORE (R-N.C.), who told her to be quiet and let the officials being questioned answered.

These interruptions have earned Harris the support of fellow Democratic women, such as Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Memo: Outrage rises among liberals over Israel The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Infrastructure, Cheney ouster on deck as Congress returns Warren says she'll run for reelection to Senate MORE (Mass.).