SPONSORED:

McCain to miss week, likely delaying healthcare vote

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainColbert mocks Gaetz after Trump denies he asked for a pardon Five reasons why US faces chronic crisis at border Meghan McCain calls on Gaetz to resign MORE (R-Ariz.) will miss this week's votes in the Senate after undergoing surgery on Friday, depriving Republicans of a key vote on healthcare.

McCain's absence means Senate Republicans almost certainly will not have the 50 votes they'd need to win a procedural vote.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulAlarm grows over impact of states banning trans youth treatment The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - World mourns the death of Prince Philip The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (R-Ky.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start Moderate GOP senators and Biden clash at start of infrastructure debate MORE (R-Maine) have already said they would oppose the procedural vote. With all Democrats voting no, that would leave Republicans with just 49 votes, given McCain's absence.

A further delay in the schedule is bad news for Senate Republicans, as it will allow opponents of the legislation more time to pressure wavering GOP centrists to vote against it.

Even with McCain, it is uncertain whether Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden to meet Monday with bipartisan lawmakers about infrastructure 100 business executives discuss how to combat new voting rules: report Arkansas governor says 'divisive' Trump attacks on GOP officials are 'unhelpful' MORE (R-Ky.) could put the 50 votes together for the bill. 

An analysis and score of the Senate GOP's new healthcare bill from the Congressional Budget Office is expected on Monday. 

Centrist GOP Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP Ohio Senate candidate asked to leave RNC retreat To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (Ohio), Shelly Moore Capito (W.Va.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump looms large over GOP donor retreat in Florida Top GOP super PAC endorses Murkowski amid primary threat Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start MORE (Alaska) and Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.) are among the swing votes. 

Portman and Heller also face pressure from Republican governors in their states who are worried the Senate bill's curtailing of federal support for ObamaCare's Medicaid expansion could hurt their constituents.

McCain's office in a statement said he is doing well after undergoing surgery to remove a blood clot from his eye on Friday.

“Senator McCain received excellent treatment at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix, and appreciates the tremendous professionalism and care by its doctors and staff. He is in good spirits and recovering comfortably at home with his family. On the advice of his doctors, Senator McCain will be recovering in Arizona next week," the statement said. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced this week he was extending the Senate's sessions for two weeks, cutting the August recess short. That could give his conference more time to get healthcare done.

McCain, 80, had the procedure done at the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix following an annual physical. 

"Surgeons successfully removed the 5-cm blood clot during a minimally invasive craniotomy with an eyebrow incision. Tissue pathology reports are pending within the next several days," the statement from the Mayo Clinic read. 

“The Senator is resting comfortably at home and is in good condition. His Mayo Clinic doctors report that the surgery went ‘very well’ and he is in good spirits. Once the pathology information is available, further care will be discussed between doctors and the family," the statement said.