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Cruz: Many Americans feel betrayed by failure to repeal ObamaCare

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzIncoming Dem lawmaker from Texas says Nielsen should be replaced as DHS chief Election Countdown: Lawsuits fly in Florida recount fight | Nelson pushes to extend deadline | Judge says Georgia county violated Civil Rights Act | Biden, Sanders lead 2020 Dem field in poll | Bloomberg to decide on 2020 by February Poll: Biden and Sanders lead 2020 Dem field, followed by Beto O'Rourke MORE (R-Texas) on Friday cast the Senate's rejection of a skinny ObamaCare repeal bill as a "betrayal" of Americans who voted for Republicans vowing to do away with the healthcare law.

"There are going to be a great many Americans who tonight feel a sense of betrayal — feel a sense of betrayal that politicians made a promise," Cruz told Fox News shortly after the healthcare vote.

"I'll tell you this, if you stand up and campaign and say we're going to repeal ObamaCare and you vote for ObamaCare, those are not consistent," he continued. "And the American people are entirely justified in saying, 'Any politician who told me that and voted the other didn't tell me the truth; they lied to me.' "

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The Senate narrowly turned down a scaled-down version of a measure to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) early Friday morning, with three Republicans — Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDems vow swift action on gun reform next year Collins reiterates call for legislation to protect Mueller investigation GOP nerves on edge after Sinema takes lead over McSally MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiEarmarks look to be making a comeback Trump and Pelosi set to collide as Democrats celebrate their power Poll: Palin unpopular in Alaska following jab at Murkowski MORE (Alaska) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainVan Hollen not interested in staying on as chair of Senate Dems' campaign arm Election Countdown: Lawsuits fly in Florida recount fight | Nelson pushes to extend deadline | Judge says Georgia county violated Civil Rights Act | Biden, Sanders lead 2020 Dem field in poll | Bloomberg to decide on 2020 by February Jeff Flake congratulates Kyrsten Sinema on win: ‘You’ll be great’ MORE (Ariz.) — voting with Democrats to reject the legislation.

The rejection all but upended Republicans' current efforts to uphold their seven-year promise to wipe out, at least in part, former President Obama's signature healthcare law.

Despite suffering years of low approval ratings, the ACA has risen in popularity in recent months, with more people in favor of keeping the law than doing away with it, according to the RealClearPolitics polling average.