The original Tea Partier exits, stage right

The original Tea Partier exits, stage right
© Greg Nash
 
But on Tuesday, the Arizona Republican said he would not seek a second term in the Senate. Both Republican and Democratic pollsters in Arizona said Flake’s approval rating has tanked in recent months, especially among Republican voters, as he clashed repeatedly with President Trump.
 
That Flake got crosswise with his home-state voters, who sided with their president over their senator, is a sign of an evolving party, one driven more by Trump’s words than Flake’s deeds.
 
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Flake came to Capitol Hill in 2001 as a reformer who wanted to end Congress’s big-spending ways. His arrival was one of the first signs that a new era of spendthrift conservatism was becoming fashionable.
 
“He was the Club for Growth’s first win. He was their poster child,” said Brett Mecum, an Arizona Republican strategist, referring to a major conservative interest group whose power has grown.
 
During six terms in the House, Flake acted as a thorn in the side of congressional leadership. He repeatedly forced votes to strip earmarks out of costly spending bills, embarrassing Republican colleagues who had to vote down his amendments to save their pork projects. 
 
“Flake was one of the early leaders on this. And it was a very lonely fight at first,” said Michael Steel, who worked for House Republican leaders and later for Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBoehner says it's Democrats' turn for a Tea Party movement House Republicans find silver lining in minority Alaskan becomes longest serving Republican in House history MORE (R-Ohio). “Jeff Flake and a handful of other members at first kind of stood up to their leadership and said this is wrong, this is a symbol of a broken Washington.”
 
Every week for a decade, Flake’s office named an “egregious earmark of the week,” spotlighting government spending he thought was out of bounds in press releases often tinged with a humorous quip.
 
“Read my lips: no new earmarks,” Flake deadpanned in one release, highlighting $300,000 set aside for construction of the George and Barbara Bush Cultural Center at the University of New England. 
 
Another winner: $150,000 for an actor’s theater in Kentucky. “It’d be nice if Congress starting acting more fiscally responsible,” Flake said at the time.
 
Flake may hold the distinction of being the only member of Congress to seek a seat on the powerful House Appropriations Committee with the explicit goal of ending or limiting earmarks.
 
 
Even as he needled his own leadership, Flake maintained a sunny disposition and good relations with the leaders he battled. Other Republicans who voted against leadership priorities lost their committee seats; Flake won the establishment’s support when he ran for an open Senate seat in 2012.
 
That year, Flake won what most Arizona Republicans expected to be the first of several terms.
 
But Flake watched his approval rating decline precipitously after taking issue with Trump, first as a candidate, then as a president. Some Republican insiders worried Flake was risking his career when he published an anti-Trump book earlier this year.
 
Flake acknowledged the changing face of the Republican Party as he announced his retirement Tuesday on the Senate floor.
 
“It is clear at this moment that a traditional conservative who believes in limited government and free markets … has a narrower and narrower path to nomination in the Republican Party,” Flake said Tuesday. “It’s also clear to me, in this moment, we have given up our core principles in favor of a more visceral anger and resentment [that] are not a governing philosophy.” 
 
Trump has routinely butted heads with Republican leaders, from House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanFormer Dem candidate says he faced cultural barriers on the campaign trail because he is working-class Former House candidate and ex-ironworker says there is 'buyer's remorse' for Trump in Midwest Head of top hedge fund association to step down MORE (R-Wis.) to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems eye next stage in Mueller fight House Oversight Dem wants Trump to release taxes and 'get it over with' Senate rejection of Green New Deal won't slow Americans' desire for climate action MORE, Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGraham: McCain 'acted appropriately' by handing Steele dossier to FBI What should Democrats do next, after Mueller's report? Tom Daschle: McCain was a model to be emulated, not criticized MORE (R-Ariz.) and, on Tuesday morning, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump keeps tight grip on GOP Brexit and exit: A transatlantic comparison Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (R-Tenn.). 
 
Those fights have complicated and imperiled the Republican agenda, sewed bitter seeds between the two sides of Pennsylvania Avenue — and diminished Republican leaders in the eyes of their own voters.
 
As Flake was the harbinger of a new wave of fiscally stingy conservatives, so too has Trump foretold of a new generation of Republicans to come. This generation is unlikely to be as optimistic about their ability to change Washington as Flake was, even when he faced long odds.
 
“It’s not enough to be conservative anymore,” Flake said on CNN Tuesday afternoon. “It seems that you have to be angry about it.”